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Grab Sitecore Experience Forms Configuration Settings from a Custom SQL Server Database Table

Just the other day, I poking around Sitecore Experience Forms to see what’s customisable and have pretty much concluded virtually everything is.

morpheus

How?

Just have a look at http://[instance]/sitecore/admin/showservicesconfig.aspx of your Sitecore instance and scan for “ExperienceForms”. You will also discover lots of its service class are registered in Sitecore’s IoC container — such makes it easy to swap things out with your own service implementation classes as long as they implement those service types defined in the container.

Since I love to tinkering with all things in Sitecore — most especially when it comes to customising bits of it — I decided to have a crack at replacing IFormsConfigurationSettings — more specifically Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration.IFormsConfigurationSettings in Sitecore.ExperienceForms.dll which represents Sitecore configuration settings for Experience Forms — as it appeared to be something simple enough to do.

The IFormsConfigurationSettings interface represents the following configuration settings:

config-settings-ootb

So, what did I do to customise it?

I wrote a bunch of code — it’s all in this post — which pulls these settings from a custom SQL Server database table.

in-da-db.gif

Why did I do that? Well, I did it because I could. πŸ˜‰

Years ago, long before my Sitecore days, I worked on ASP.NET Web Applications which had their configuration settings stored in SQL Server databases. Whether this was, or still is, a good idea is a discussion for another time though you are welcome to drop a comment below with your thoughts.

However, for the meantime, just roll with it as the point of this post is to show that you can customise virtually everything in Experience Forms, and I’m just showing one example.

I first created the following class which implements IFormsConfigurationSettings:

using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models.Configuration
{
	public class SandboxFormsConfigurationSettings : IFormsConfigurationSettings
	{
		public string ConnectionStringName { get; set; }

		public string FieldsPrefix { get; set; }

		public string FieldsIndexName { get; set; }
	}
}

You might be asking “Mike, why did you create an implementation class when Experience Forms already provides one ‘out of the box’?”

Well, all the properties defined in Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration.IFormsConfigurationSettings — these are the same properties that you see in the implementation class above — lack mutators on them in the interface. My implementation class of IFormsConfigurationSettings adds them in — I hate baking method calls in property accessors as it doesn’t seem clean to me. Β―\_(ツ)_/Β―

When I had a look at the “out of the box” implementation class of IFormsConfigurationSettings, I discovered direct calls to the GetSetting() method on the Sitecore.Configuration.Settings static class — this lives in Sitecore.Kernel.dll — but that doesn’t help me with setting those properties, hence the custom IFormsConfigurationSettings class above.

Next, I used the following SQL script to create my custom settings database table:

USE [ExperienceFormsSettings]
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FormsConfigurationSettings](
	[FieldsPrefix] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
	[FieldsIndexName] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
	[ConnectionStringName] [nvarchar](max) NULL
) ON [PRIMARY] TEXTIMAGE_ON [PRIMARY]
GO

I then inserted the settings from the configuration file snapshot above into my new table (I’ve omitted the SQL insert statement for this):

config-database

Now we need a way to retrieve these settings from the database. The following interface will be for factory classes which create instances of Sitecore.Data.DataProviders.Sql.SqlDataApi — this lives in Sitecore.Kernel.dll — with the passed connection strings:

using Sitecore.Data.DataProviders.Sql;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories
{
	public interface ISqlDataApiFactory
	{
		SqlDataApi CreateSqlDataApi(string connectionString);
	}
}

Well, we can’t do much with an interface without having some class implement it. The following class implements the interface above:

using Sitecore.Data.DataProviders.Sql;
using Sitecore.Data.SqlServer;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories
{
	public class SqlDataApiFactory : ISqlDataApiFactory
	{
		public SqlDataApi CreateSqlDataApi(string connectionString)
		{
			if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(connectionString))
			{
				return null;
			}

			return new SqlServerDataApi(connectionString);
		}
	}
}

It’s just creating an instance of the SqlServerDataApi class. Nothing special about it at all.

Ironically, I do have to save my own configuration settings in Sitecore Configuration — this would include the the connection string name to the database that contains my new table as well as a few other things.

An instance of the following class will contain these settings — have a look at /sitecore/moduleSettings/foundation/forms/repositorySettings in the Sitecore patch file near the bottom of this post but be sure to come back up here when you are finished πŸ˜‰ — and this instance will be put into the Sitecore IoC container so it can be injected in an instance of a class I’ll talk about further down in this post:

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models.Configuration
{
	public class RepositorySettings
	{
		public string ConnectionStringName { get; set; }

		public string GetSettingsSql { get; set; }

		public string ConnectionStringNameColumnName { get; set; }

		public string FieldsPrefixColumnName { get; set; }

		public string FieldsIndexNameColumnName { get; set; }

		public int NotFoundOrdinal { get; set; }
	}
}

I then defined the following interface for repository classes which retrieve IFormsConfigurationSettings instances:

using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Repositories.Configuration
{
	public interface ISettingsRepository
	{
		IFormsConfigurationSettings GetFormsConfigurationSettings();
	}
}

Here’s the implementation class for the interface above:

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Abstractions;
using Sitecore.Data.DataProviders.Sql;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Diagnostics;

using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models.Configuration;
using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Repositories.Configuration
{
	public class SettingsRepository : ISettingsRepository
	{
		private readonly RepositorySettings _repositorySettings;
		private readonly BaseSettings _settings;
		private readonly int _notFoundOrdinal;
		private readonly ILogger _logger;
		private readonly SqlDataApi _sqlDataApi;

		public SettingsRepository(RepositorySettings repositorySettings, BaseSettings settings, ILogger logger, ISqlDataApiFactory sqlDataApiFactory)
		{
			_repositorySettings = repositorySettings;
			_settings = settings;
			_notFoundOrdinal = GetNotFoundOrdinal();
			_logger = logger;
			_sqlDataApi = GetSqlDataApi(sqlDataApiFactory);
		}

		protected virtual SqlDataApi GetSqlDataApi(ISqlDataApiFactory sqlDataApiFactory)
		{
			return sqlDataApiFactory.CreateSqlDataApi(GetConnectionString());
		}

		protected virtual string GetConnectionString()
		{
			return _settings.GetConnectionString(GetConnectionStringName());
		}

		protected virtual string GetConnectionStringName()
		{
			return _repositorySettings.ConnectionStringName;
		}

		public IFormsConfigurationSettings GetFormsConfigurationSettings()
		{
			try
			{
				return _sqlDataApi.CreateObjectReader(GetSqlQuery(), GetParameters(), GetMaterializer()).FirstOrDefault();
			}
			catch (Exception ex)
			{
				LogError(ex);
				
			}

			return CreateFormsConfigurationSettingsNullObject();
		}

		protected virtual string GetSqlQuery()
		{
			return _repositorySettings.GetSettingsSql;
		}

		protected virtual object[] GetParameters()
		{
			return Enumerable.Empty<object>().ToArray();
		}

		protected virtual Func<IDataReader, IFormsConfigurationSettings> GetMaterializer()
		{
			return new Func<IDataReader, IFormsConfigurationSettings>(ParseFormsConfigurationSettings);
		}

		protected virtual IFormsConfigurationSettings ParseFormsConfigurationSettings(IDataReader dataReader)
		{
			return new SandboxFormsConfigurationSettings
			{
				ConnectionStringName = GetString(dataReader, GetConnectionStringNameColumnName()),
				FieldsPrefix = GetString(dataReader, GetFieldsPrefixColumnName()),
				FieldsIndexName = GetString(dataReader, GetFieldsIndexNameColumnName())
			};
		}

		protected virtual string GetString(IDataReader dataReader, string columnName)
		{
			if(dataReader == null || string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(columnName))
			{
				return string.Empty;

			}

			int ordinal = GetOrdinal(dataReader, columnName);
			if(ordinal == _notFoundOrdinal)
			{
				return string.Empty;
			}

			return dataReader.GetString(ordinal);
		}

		protected virtual int GetOrdinal(IDataReader dataReader, string columnName)
		{
			if(dataReader == null || string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(columnName))
			{
				return _notFoundOrdinal;
			}

			try
			{
				return dataReader.GetOrdinal(columnName);
			}
			catch(IndexOutOfRangeException)
			{
				return _notFoundOrdinal;
			}
		}

		protected virtual int GetNotFoundOrdinal()
		{
			return _repositorySettings.NotFoundOrdinal;
		}

		protected virtual void LogError(Exception exception)
		{
			_logger.LogError(ToString(), exception, this);
		}

		protected virtual string GetConnectionStringNameColumnName()
		{
			return _repositorySettings.ConnectionStringNameColumnName;
		}

		protected virtual string GetFieldsPrefixColumnName()
		{
			return _repositorySettings.FieldsPrefixColumnName;
		}

		protected virtual string GetFieldsIndexNameColumnName()
		{
			return _repositorySettings.FieldsIndexNameColumnName;
		}

		protected virtual IFormsConfigurationSettings CreateFormsConfigurationSettingsNullObject()
		{
			return new SandboxFormsConfigurationSettings
			{
				ConnectionStringName = string.Empty,
				FieldsIndexName = string.Empty,
				FieldsPrefix = string.Empty
			};
		}
	}
}

I’m not going to go into details of all the code above but will talk about some important pieces.

The GetFormsConfigurationSettings() method above creates an instance of the IFormsConfigurationSettings instance using the SqlDataApi instance created from the injected factory service — this was defined above — with the SQL query provided from configuration along with the GetMaterializer() method which just uses the ParseFormsConfigurationSettings() method to create an instance of the IFormsConfigurationSettings by grabbing data from the IDataReader instance.

Phew, I’m out of breath as that was a mouthful. πŸ˜‰

I then registered all of my service classes above in the Sitecore IoC container using the following the configurator — aka a class that implements the IServicesConfigurator interface:

using System;

using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

using Sitecore.Abstractions;
using Sitecore.DependencyInjection;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration;

using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Repositories.Configuration;
using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models.Configuration;

using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms
{
	public class SettingsConfigurator : IServicesConfigurator
	{
		public void Configure(IServiceCollection serviceCollection)
		{
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton(provider => GetRepositorySettings(provider));
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton<ISqlDataApiFactory, SqlDataApiFactory>();
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton<ISettingsRepository, SettingsRepository>();
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton(provider => GetFormsConfigurationSettings(provider));
		}

		private RepositorySettings GetRepositorySettings(IServiceProvider provider)
		{
			return CreateConfigObject<RepositorySettings>(provider, "moduleSettings/foundation/forms/repositorySettings");
		}

		private TConfigObject CreateConfigObject<TConfigObject>(IServiceProvider provider, string path) where TConfigObject : class
		{
			BaseFactory factory = GetService<BaseFactory>(provider);
			return factory.CreateObject(path, true) as TConfigObject;
		}

		private IFormsConfigurationSettings GetFormsConfigurationSettings(IServiceProvider provider)
		{
			ISettingsRepository repository = GetService<ISettingsRepository>(provider);
			return repository.GetFormsConfigurationSettings();
		}

		private TService GetService<TService>(IServiceProvider provider)
		{
			return provider.GetService<TService>();
		}
	}
}

One thing to note is the GetRepositorySettings() method above uses the Configuration Factory — this is represented by the BaseFactory abstract class which lives in the Sitecore IoC container “out of the box” — to create an instance of the RepositorySettings class, defined further up in this post, using the settings in the following Sitecore patch file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
	<sitecore>
		<services>
			<configurator type="Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.SettingsConfigurator, Sandbox.Foundation.Forms" />
			<register serviceType="Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration.IFormsConfigurationSettings, Sitecore.ExperienceForms">
				<patch:delete />
			</register>
		</services>

		<moduleSettings>
			<foundation>
				<forms>
					<repositorySettings type="Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models.Configuration.RepositorySettings, Sandbox.Foundation.Forms" singleInstance="true">
						<ConnectionStringName>ExperienceFormsSettings</ConnectionStringName>
						<GetSettingsSql>SELECT TOP (1) {0}ConnectionStringName{1},{0}FieldsPrefix{1},{0}FieldsIndexName{1} FROM {0}FormsConfigurationSettings{1}</GetSettingsSql>
						<ConnectionStringNameColumnName>ConnectionStringName</ConnectionStringNameColumnName>
						<FieldsPrefixColumnName>FieldsPrefix</FieldsPrefixColumnName>
						<FieldsIndexNameColumnName>FieldsIndexName</FieldsIndexNameColumnName>
						<NotFoundOrdinal>-1</NotFoundOrdinal> 
					</repositorySettings>
				</forms>
			</foundation>
		</moduleSettings>
	</sitecore>
</configuration> 

I want to point out that I’m deleting the Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Configuration.IFormsConfigurationSettings service from Sitecore’s configuration as I am adding it back in to the Sitecore IoC container with my own via the configurator above.

After deploying everything, I waited for my Sitecore instance to reload.

jones-testing.gif

Once Sitecore was responsive again, I navigated to “Forms” on the Sitecore Launch Pad and made sure everything had still worked as before.

It did.

Trust me, it did. πŸ˜‰

living-in-db

If you have any questions/comments on any of the above, or would just like to drop a line to say “hello”, then please share in a comment below.

Otherwise, until next time, keep on Sitecoring.

Encrypt Sitecore Experience Forms Data in Powerful Ways

Last week, I was honoured to co-present Sitecore Experience Forms alongside my dear friend — and fellow trollster πŸ˜‰ — Sitecore MVP Kamruz Jaman at SUGCON EU 2018. We had a blast showing the ins and outs of Experience Forms, and of course trolled a bit whilst on the main stage.

During our talk, Kamruz had mentioned the possibility of replacing the “Out of the Box” (OOTB) Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.IFormDataProvider — this lives in Sitecore.ExperienceForms.dll — whose class implementations serve as Repository objects for storing or retrieving from some datastore (in Experience Forms this is MS SQL Server OOTB) with another to encrypt/decrypt data when saving to or retrieving from the datastore.

Well, I had done something exactly like this for Web Forms for Marketers (WFFM) about five years ago — be sure to have a read my blog post on this before proceeding as it gives context to the rest of this blog post — so thought it would be appropriate for me to have a swing at doing this for Experience Forms.

I first created an interface for classes that will encrypt/decrypt strings — this is virtually the same interface I had used in my older post on encrypting data in WFFM:

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Encryption
{
	public interface IEncryptor
	{
		string Encrypt(string key, string input);

		string Decrypt(string key, string input);
	}
}

I then created a class to encrypt/decrypt strings using the RC2 encryption algorithm — I had also poached this from my older post on encrypting data in WFFM (please note, this encryption algorithm is not the most robust so do not use this in any production environment. Please be sure to use something more robust):

using System.Text;
using System.Security.Cryptography;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Encryption
{
	public class RC2Encryptor : IEncryptor
	{
		public string Encrypt(string key, string input)
		{
			byte[] inputArray = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(input);
			RC2CryptoServiceProvider rc2 = new RC2CryptoServiceProvider();
			rc2.Key = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key);
			rc2.Mode = CipherMode.ECB;
			rc2.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
			ICryptoTransform cTransform = rc2.CreateEncryptor();
			byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(inputArray, 0, inputArray.Length);
			rc2.Clear();
			return System.Convert.ToBase64String(resultArray, 0, resultArray.Length);
		}

		public string Decrypt(string key, string input)
		{
			byte[] inputArray = System.Convert.FromBase64String(input);
			RC2CryptoServiceProvider rc2 = new RC2CryptoServiceProvider();
			rc2.Key = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key);
			rc2.Mode = CipherMode.ECB;
			rc2.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
			ICryptoTransform cTransform = rc2.CreateDecryptor();
			byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(inputArray, 0, inputArray.Length);
			rc2.Clear();
			return UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultArray);
		}
	}
}

Next, I created the following class to store settings I need for encrypting and decrypting data using the RC2 algorithm class above:

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models
{
	public class FormEncryptionSettings
	{
		public string EncryptionKey { get; set; }
	}
}

The encryption key above is needed for the RC2 algorithm to encrypt/decrypt data. I set this key in a config object defined in a Sitecore patch configuration file towards the bottom of this post.

I then created an interface for classes that will encrypt/decrypt FormEntry instances (FormEntry objects contain submitted data from form submissions):

using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.Entities;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Encryption
{
	public interface IFormEntryEncryptor
	{
		void EncryptFormEntry(FormEntry entry);

		void DecryptFormEntry(FormEntry entry);
	}
}

The following class implements the interface above:

using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.Entities;

using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Encryption
{
	public class FormEntryEncryptor : IFormEntryEncryptor
	{
		private readonly FormEncryptionSettings _formEncryptionSettings;
		private readonly IEncryptor _encryptor;

		public FormEntryEncryptor(FormEncryptionSettings formEncryptionSettings, IEncryptor encryptor)
		{
			_formEncryptionSettings = formEncryptionSettings;
			_encryptor = encryptor;
		}

		public void EncryptFormEntry(FormEntry entry)
		{
			if (!HasFields(entry))
			{
				return;
			}

			foreach (FieldData field in entry.Fields)
			{
				EncryptField(field);
			}
		}

		protected virtual void EncryptField(FieldData field)
		{
			if(field == null)
			{
				return;
			}

			field.FieldName = Encrypt(field.FieldName);
			field.Value = Encrypt(field.Value);
			field.ValueType = Encrypt(field.ValueType);
		}

		protected virtual string Encrypt(string input)
		{
			return _encryptor.Encrypt(_formEncryptionSettings.EncryptionKey, input);
		}

		public void DecryptFormEntry(FormEntry entry)
		{
			if (!HasFields(entry))
			{
				return;
			}

			foreach (FieldData field in entry.Fields)
			{
				DecryptField(field);
			}
		}

		protected virtual bool HasFields(FormEntry entry)
		{
			return entry != null
					&& entry.Fields != null
					&& entry.Fields.Any();
		}

		protected virtual void DecryptField(FieldData field)
		{
			if(field == null)
			{
				return;
			}

			field.FieldName = Decrypt(field.FieldName);
			field.Value = Decrypt(field.Value);
			field.ValueType = Decrypt(field.ValueType);
		}

		protected virtual string Decrypt(string input)
		{
			return _encryptor.Decrypt(_formEncryptionSettings.EncryptionKey, input);
		}
	}
}

The EncryptFormEntry() method above iterates over all FieldData objects contained on the FormEntry instance, and passes them to the EncryptField() mehod which encrypts the FieldName, Value and ValueType properties on them.

Likewise, the DecryptFormEntry() method iterates over all FieldData objects contained on the FormEntry instance, and passes them to the DecryptField() mehod which decrypts the same properties mentioned above.

I then created an interface for classes that will serve as factories for IFormDataProvider instances:

using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.SqlServer;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories
{
	public interface IFormDataProviderFactory
	{
		IFormDataProvider CreateNewSqlFormDataProvider(ISqlDataApiFactory sqlDataApiFactory);
	}
}

The following class implements the interface above:

using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.SqlServer;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories
{
	public class FormDataProviderFactory : IFormDataProviderFactory
	{
		public IFormDataProvider CreateNewSqlFormDataProvider(ISqlDataApiFactory sqlDataApiFactory)
		{
			return new SqlFormDataProvider(sqlDataApiFactory);
		}
	}
}

The CreateNewSqlFormDataProvider() method above does exactly was the method name says. You’ll see it being used in the following class below.

This next class ultimately becomes the new IFormDataProvider instance but decorates the OOTB one which is created from the factory class above:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;


using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.Entities;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data.SqlServer;

using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Encryption;
using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Data
{
	public class FormEncryptionDataProvider : IFormDataProvider
	{
		private readonly IFormDataProvider _innerProvider;
		private readonly IFormEntryEncryptor _formEntryEncryptor;

		public FormEncryptionDataProvider(ISqlDataApiFactory sqlDataApiFactory, IFormDataProviderFactory formDataProviderFactory, IFormEntryEncryptor formEntryEncryptor)
		{
			_innerProvider = CreateInnerProvider(sqlDataApiFactory, formDataProviderFactory);
			_formEntryEncryptor = formEntryEncryptor;
		}

		protected virtual IFormDataProvider CreateInnerProvider(ISqlDataApiFactory sqlDataApiFactory, IFormDataProviderFactory formDataProviderFactory)
		{
			return formDataProviderFactory.CreateNewSqlFormDataProvider(sqlDataApiFactory);
		}

		public void CreateEntry(FormEntry entry)
		{
			EncryptFormEntryField(entry);
			_innerProvider.CreateEntry(entry);
		}

		protected virtual void EncryptFormEntryField(FormEntry entry)
		{
			_formEntryEncryptor.EncryptFormEntry(entry);
		}

		public void DeleteEntries(Guid formId)
		{
			_innerProvider.DeleteEntries(formId);
		}

		public IReadOnlyCollection<FormEntry> GetEntries(Guid formId, DateTime? startDate, DateTime? endDate)
		{
			IReadOnlyCollection<FormEntry>  entries = _innerProvider.GetEntries(formId, startDate, endDate);
			if(entries == null || !entries.Any())
			{
				return entries;
			}

			foreach(FormEntry entry in entries)
			{
				DecryptFormEntryField(entry);
			}

			return entries;
		}

		protected virtual void DecryptFormEntryField(FormEntry entry)
		{
			_formEntryEncryptor.DecryptFormEntry(entry);
		}
	}
}

The class above does delegation to the IFormEntryEncryptor instance to encrypt the FormEntry data and then passes the FormEntry to the inner provider for saving.

For decrypting, it retrieves the data from the inner provider, and then decrypts it via the IFormEntryEncryptor instance before returning to the caller.

Finally, I created an IServicesConfigurator class to wire everything up into the Sitecore container (I hope you are using Sitecore Dependency Injection capabilities as this comes OOTB — there are no excuses for not using this!!!!!!):

using System;

using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

using Sitecore.Abstractions;
using Sitecore.DependencyInjection;
using Sitecore.ExperienceForms.Data;

using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models;
using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Encryption;
using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Data;
using Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Services.Factories;

namespace Sandbox.Foundation.Forms
{
	public class FormsServicesConfigurator : IServicesConfigurator
	{
		public void Configure(IServiceCollection serviceCollection)
		{
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton(provider => GetFormEncryptionSettings(provider));
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton<IEncryptor, RC2Encryptor>();
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton<IFormEntryEncryptor, FormEntryEncryptor>();
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton<IFormDataProviderFactory, FormDataProviderFactory>();
			serviceCollection.AddSingleton<IFormDataProvider, FormEncryptionDataProvider>();
		}

		private FormEncryptionSettings GetFormEncryptionSettings(IServiceProvider provider)
		{
			return CreateConfigObject<FormEncryptionSettings>(provider, "moduleSettings/foundation/forms/formEncryptionSettings");
		}

		private TConfigObject CreateConfigObject<TConfigObject>(IServiceProvider provider, string path) where TConfigObject : class
		{
			BaseFactory factory = GetService<BaseFactory>(provider);
			return factory.CreateObject(path, true) as TConfigObject;
		}

		private TService GetService<TService>(IServiceProvider provider)
		{
			return provider.GetService<TService>();
		}
	}
}

Everything above is normal service class registration except for the stuff in the GetFormEncryptionSettings() method. Here, I’m creating an instance of a FormEncryptionSettings class but am instantiating it using the Sitecore Configuration Factory for the configuration object defined in the Sitecore patch configuration file below, and am making that available for being injected into classes that need it (the FormEntryEncryptor above uses it).

I then wired everything together using the following Sitecore patch configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
	<sitecore>
		<services>
			<configurator type="Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.FormsServicesConfigurator, Sandbox.Foundation.Forms" />
			<register serviceType="Sitecore.ExperienceForms.IFormDataProvider, Sitecore.ExperienceForms">
				<patch:delete />
			</register>
		</services>
		<moduleSettings>
			<foundation>
				<forms>
					<formEncryptionSettings type="Sandbox.Foundation.Forms.Models.FormEncryptionSettings, Sandbox.Foundation.Forms" singleInstance="true">
						<!-- I stole this from https://sitecorejunkie.com/2013/06/21/encrypt-web-forms-for-marketers-fields-in-sitecore/ -->
						<EncryptionKey>88bca90e90875a</EncryptionKey>
					</formEncryptionSettings>
				</forms>
			</foundation>
		</moduleSettings>
	</sitecore>
</configuration>

I want to call out that I’m deleting the OOTB IFormDataProvider above using a patch:delete. I’m re-adding it via the IServicesConfigurator above using the decorator class previously shown above.

Let’s take this for a spin.

I first created a new form (this is under “Forms” on the Sitecore Launchepad ):

I then put it on a page with an MVC Layout; published everything; navigated to the test page with the form created above; filled out the form; and then clicked the submit button:

Let’s see if the data was encrypted. I opened up SQL Server Management Studio and ran a query on the FormEntry table in my Experience Forms Database:

As you can see the data was encrypted.

Let’s export the data to make sure it gets decrypted. We can do that by exporting the data as a CSV from Forms in the Sitecore Launchpad:

As you can see the data is decrypted in the CSV:

I do want to mention that Sitecore MVP JoΓ£o Neto had provided two other methods for encrypting data in Experience Forms in a post he wrote last January. I recommend having a read of that.

Until next time, see you on the Sitecore Slack πŸ˜‰

Display How Many Bucketed Items Live Within a Sitecore Item Bucket Using a Custom DataView

Over the past few weeks — if you haven’t noticed — I’ve been having a blast experimenting with Sitecore Item Buckets. It seems new ideas on what to build for it keep flooding my thoughts everyday. πŸ˜€

However, the other day an old idea that I wanted to solve a while back bubbled its way up into the forefront of my consciousness: displaying the count of Bucketed Items which live within each Item Bucket in the Content Tree.

I’m sure someone has built something to do this before though I didn’t really do any research on it as I was up for the challenge.

darth-vader-didnt-read

In all honesty, I enjoy spending my nights after work and on weekends building things in Sitecore — even if someone has built something like it before — as it’s a great way to not only discover new treasures hidden within the Sitecore assemblies, but also improve my programming skills — the saying “you lose it if you don’t use it” applies here.

nerds

You might be asking “Mike, we don’t store that many Sitecore Items in our Item Buckets; I can just go count them all by hand”.

Well, if that’s the case for you then you might want to reconsider why you are using the Item Buckets feature.

However, in theory, thousands if not millions of Items can live within an Item Bucket in Sitecore. If counting by hand is your thing — or even writing some sort of “script” (I’m not referring to PowerShell scripts that you would write using Sitecore PowerShell Extensions (SPE) — I definitely recommend harnessing all of the power this module has to offer — but instead to standalone ASP.NET Web Forms which some people erroneously call “scripts”) to generate some kind of report, then by all means go for it.

counting

That’s just not how I roll.

aint-no-time-for-that

So how are we going to display these counts to the user? We are ultimately going to create a custom Sitecore DataView.

If you aren’t familiar with DataViews in Sitecore, they basically allow you to change how Items are displayed in the Sitecore Content Tree.

I’m not going to go too much into details of how these work. I recommend having a read of the following posts by two fellow Sitecore MVPs for more information and to see other examples:

I do want to warn you: there is a lot of code in this post.

arghhhhh

You might want to go get a snack for this as it might take a while to get through all the code that I am showing here. Don’t worry, I’ll wait for you to get back.

eat-popcorn

Anyways, let’s jump right into it.

partay-meow

For this feature, I want to add a checkbox toggle in the Sitecore Ribbon to give users the ability turn this feature on and off.

bucketed-items-count-view-ribbon

In order to save the state of this checkbox, I defined the following interface:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registries
{
    public interface IRegistry
    {
        bool GetBool(string key);

        bool GetBool(string key, bool defaultvalue);

        int GetInt(string key);

        int GetInt(string key, int defaultvalue);

        string GetString(string key);

        string GetString(string key, string defaultvalue);

        string GetValue(string key);

        void SetBool(string key, bool val);

        void SetInt(string key, int val);

        void SetString(string key, string value);

        void SetValue(string key, string value);
    }
}

Classes of the above interface will keep track of settings which need to be stored somewhere.

The following class implements the interface above:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registries
{
    public class Registry : IRegistry
    {
        public virtual bool GetBool(string key)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetBool(key);
        }

        public virtual bool GetBool(string key, bool defaultvalue)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetBool(key, defaultvalue);
        }

        public virtual int GetInt(string key)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetInt(key);
        }

        public virtual int GetInt(string key, int defaultvalue)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetInt(key, defaultvalue);
        }

        public virtual string GetString(string key)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetString(key);
        }

        public virtual string GetString(string key, string defaultvalue)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetString(key, defaultvalue);
        }

        public virtual string GetValue(string key)
        {
            return Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.GetValue(key);
        }

        public virtual void SetBool(string key, bool val)
        {
            Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.SetBool(key, val);
        }

        public virtual void SetInt(string key, int val)
        {
            Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.SetInt(key, val);
        }

        public virtual void SetString(string key, string value)
        {
            Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.SetString(key, value);
        }

        public virtual void SetValue(string key, string value)
        {
            Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry.SetValue(key, value);
        }
    }
}

I’m basically wrapping calls to methods on the static Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registry class which is used for saving state on the checkboxes in the Sitecore ribbon — it might be used for keeping track of other things in the Sitecore Content Editor though that is beyond the scope of this post. Nothing magical going on here.

I then defined the following interface for keeping track of Content Editor settings for things related to Item Buckets:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Settings
{
    public interface IBucketsContentEditorSettings
    {
        bool ShowBucketedItemsCount { get; set; }

        bool AreItemBucketsEnabled { get; }
    }
}

The ShowBucketedItemsCount boolean property lets the caller know if we are to show the Bucketed Items count, and the AreItemBucketsEnabled boolean property lets the caller know if the Item Buckets feature is enabled in Sitecore.

The following class implements the interface above:

using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Determiners.Features;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registries;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Settings
{
    public class BucketsContentEditorSettings : IBucketsContentEditorSettings
    {
        protected IFeatureDeterminer ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer { get; set; }
        
        protected IRegistry Registry { get; set; }

        protected string ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey { get; set; }

        public bool ShowBucketedItemsCount
        {
            get
            {
                return ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount();
            }
            set
            {
                ToggleShowBucketedItemsCount(value);
            }
        }

        public bool AreItemBucketsEnabled
        {
            get
            {
                return GetAreItemBucketsEnabled();
            }
        }

        protected virtual bool ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount()
        {
            if (!AreItemBucketsEnabled)
            {
                return false;
            }

            EnsureRegistryDependencies();
            return Registry.GetBool(ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey, false);
        }

        protected virtual void ToggleShowBucketedItemsCount(bool turnOn)
        {
            
            if (!AreItemBucketsEnabled)
            {
                return;
            }

            EnsureRegistryDependencies();
            Registry.SetBool(ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey, turnOn);
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureRegistryDependencies()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(Registry, "Registry must be defined in configuration!");
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey, "ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey must be defined in configuration!");
        }

        protected virtual bool GetAreItemBucketsEnabled()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer, "ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer must be defined in configuration!");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer.IsEnabled();
        }
    }
}

I’m injecting an IFeatureDeterminer instance into the instance of the class above via the Sitecore Configuration Factory — have a look at the patch configuration file further down in this post — specifically the ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer which is defined in a previous blog post. The IFeatureDeterminer instance determines whether the Item Buckets feature is turned on/off (I’m not going to repost that code here so if you haven’t seen this code, please go have a look now so you have an understanding of what it’s doing).

Its instance is used in the GetAreItemBucketsEnabled() method which just delegates to its IsEnabled() method and returns the value from that call. The GetAreItemBucketsEnabled() method is used in the get accessor of the AreItemBucketsEnabled property.

I’m also injecting an IRegistry instance into the instance of the class above — this is also defined in the patch configuration file further down — which is used for storing/retrieving the value of the ShowBucketedItemsCount property.

It is leveraged in the ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount() and ToggleShowBucketedItemsCount() methods where a boolean value is saved or retrieved, respectively, in the Sitecore Registry under a certain key — this key is also injected into the ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey property via the Sitecore Configuration Factory.

So, we now have a way to keep track of whether we should display the Bucketed Items count. We just need a way to let the user turn this on/off. To do that, I need to create a custom Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands.Command.

Since Sitecore Commands are instantiated by the CreateObject() method on the MainUtil class (this lives in the Sitecore namespace in Sitecore.Kernel.dll and isn’t as advanced as the Sitecore.Configuration.Factory class as it won’t instantiate nested objects defined in configuration as does the Sitecore Configuration Factory), I built the following Command which will decorate Commands defined in Sitecore configuration:

using System.Xml;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls;
using Sitecore.Xml;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Commands
{
    public class ExtendedConfigCommand : Command
    {
        private Command command;
        protected Command Command
        {
            get
            {
                if(command == null)
                {
                    command = GetCommand();
                    EnsureCommand();
                }

                return command;
            }
        }
        
        protected virtual Command GetCommand()
        {
            XmlNode currentCommandNode = Factory.GetConfigNode(string.Format("commands/command[@name='{0}']", Name));
            string configPath = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("extendedCommandPath", currentCommandNode);
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(configPath, string.Format("The extendedCommandPath attribute must be set {0}!", currentCommandNode));
            Command command = Factory.CreateObject(configPath, false) as Command;
            Assert.IsNotNull(command, string.Format("The command defined at '{0}' was either not properly set or is not an instance of Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands.Command. Double-check it!", configPath));
            return command;
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureCommand()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(Command, "GetCommand() cannot return a null Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands.Command instance!");
        }

        public override void Execute(CommandContext context)
        {
            Command.Execute(context);
        }

        public override string GetClick(CommandContext context, string click)
        {
            return Command.GetClick(context, click);
        }

        public override string GetHeader(CommandContext context, string header)
        {
            return Command.GetHeader(context, header);
        }

        public override string GetIcon(CommandContext context, string icon)
        {
            return Command.GetIcon(context, icon);
        }

        public override Control[] GetSubmenuItems(CommandContext context)
        {
            return Command.GetSubmenuItems(context);
        }

        public override string GetToolTip(CommandContext context, string tooltip)
        {
            return Command.GetToolTip(context, tooltip);
        }

        public override string GetValue(CommandContext context, string value)
        {
            return Command.GetValue(context, value);
        }

        public override CommandState QueryState(CommandContext context)
        {
            return Command.QueryState(context);
        }
    }
}

The GetCommand() method reads the XmlNode for the current command, and gets the value set on its extendedCommandPath attribute. This value must to be a config path defined under the <sitecore> element in Sitecore configuration.

If the attribute doesn’t exist or is empty, or a Command instance isn’t properly created, an exception is thrown.

Otherwise, it is set on the Command property on the class.

All methods here delegate to the same methods on the Command stored in the Command property.

I then defined the following Command which will be used by the checkbox we are adding to the Sitecore Ribbon:

using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Settings;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Commands
{
    public class ToggleBucketedItemsCountCommand : Command
    {
        protected IBucketsContentEditorSettings BucketsContentEditorSettings { get; set; }

        public override void Execute(CommandContext context)
        {
            if (!AreItemBucketsEnabled())
            {
                return;
            }
            
            ToggleShowBucketedItemsCount();
            Reload();
        }

        protected virtual void ToggleShowBucketedItemsCount()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(BucketsContentEditorSettings, "BucketsContentEditorSettings must be defined in configuration!");
            BucketsContentEditorSettings.ShowBucketedItemsCount = !BucketsContentEditorSettings.ShowBucketedItemsCount;
        }

        protected virtual void Reload()
        {
            SheerResponse.SetLocation(string.Empty);
        }

        public override CommandState QueryState(CommandContext context)
        {
            if(!AreItemBucketsEnabled())
            {
                return CommandState.Hidden;
            }

            if(!ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount())
            {
                return CommandState.Enabled;
            }

            return CommandState.Down;
        }

        protected virtual bool AreItemBucketsEnabled()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(BucketsContentEditorSettings, "BucketsContentEditorSettings must be defined in configuration!");
            return BucketsContentEditorSettings.AreItemBucketsEnabled;
        }

        protected virtual bool ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(BucketsContentEditorSettings, "BucketsContentEditorSettings must be defined in configuration!");
            return BucketsContentEditorSettings.ShowBucketedItemsCount;
        }
    }
}

The QueryState() method determines whether we should display the checkbox — it will only be displayed if the Item Buckets feature is on — and what the state of the checkbox should be — if we are currently showing Bucketed Items count, the checkbox will be checked (this is represented by CommandState.Down). Otherwise, it will be unchecked (this is represented by CommandState.Enabled).

The Execute() method encapsulates the logic of what we are to do when the user checks/unchecks the checkbox. It’s basically delegating to the ToggleShowBucketedItemsCount() method to toggle the value of whether we are to display the Bucketed Items count, and then reloads the Content Editor to refresh the display in the Content Tree.

I then had to define this checkbox in the Core database:

bucketed-items-count-checkbox-core

I’m not going to go into details of how the above works as I’ve written over a gazillion posts on the subject. I recommend having a read of one of these older posts.

After going back to my Master database, I saw the new checkbox in the Sitecore Ribbon:

buckted-items-count-new-checkbox

Since we could be dealing with thousands — if not millions — of Bucketed Items for each Item Bucket, we need a performant way to grab the count of these Items. In this solution, I am leveraging the Sitecore.ContentSearch API to get these counts though needed to add some custom
Computed Index Field classes:

using Sitecore.Buckets.Managers;
using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.ComputedFields;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.ContentSearch.ComputedFields
{
    public class IsBucketed : AbstractComputedIndexField
    {
        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; private set; }

        public IsBucketed()
        {
            ItemBucketsFeatureMethods = GetItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, "GetItemBucketsFeatureMethods() cannot return null!");
        }

        protected virtual IItemBucketsFeatureMethods GetItemBucketsFeatureMethods()
        {
            IItemBucketsFeatureMethods methods = Factory.CreateObject("buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods", false) as IItemBucketsFeatureMethods;
            Assert.IsNotNull(methods, "the IItemBucketsFeatureMethods instance was not defined properly in /sitecore/buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods!");
            return methods;
        }

        public override object ComputeFieldValue(IIndexable indexable)
        {
            Item item = indexable as SitecoreIndexableItem;
            if (item == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            
            return IsBucketable(item) && IsItemContainedWithinBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsBucketable(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return BucketManager.IsBucketable(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemContainedWithinBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if(IsItemBucket(item))
            {
                return false;
            }

            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemContainedWithinBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if (!ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item))
            {
                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }
    }
}

An instance of the class above ultimately determines if an Item is bucketed within an Item Bucket, and passes a boolean value to its caller denoting this via its ComputeFieldValue() method.

What determines whether an Item is bucketed? The code above says it’s bucketed only when the Item is bucketable and is contained within an Item Bucket.

The IsBucketable() method above ascertains whether the Item is bucketable by delegating to the IsBucketable() method on the BucketManager class in Sitecore.Buckets.dll.

The IsItemContainedWithinBucket() method determines if the Item is contained within an Item Bucket — you might be laughing as the name on the method is self-documenting — by delegating to the IsItemContainedWithinBucket() method on the IItemBucketsFeatureMethods instance — I’ve defined the code for this in this post so go have a look.

Moreover, the code does not consider Item Buckets to be Bucketed as that just doesn’t make much sense. πŸ˜‰ This would also give us an inaccurate count.

The following Computed Index Field’s ComputeFieldValue() method returns the string representation of the ancestor Item Bucket’s Sitecore.Data.ID for the Item — if it is contained within an Item Bucket:

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.ComputedFields;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Utilities;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.ContentSearch.ComputedFields
{
    public class ItemBucketAncestorId : AbstractComputedIndexField
    {
        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; private set; }

        public ItemBucketAncestorId()
        {
            ItemBucketsFeatureMethods = GetItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, "GetItemBucketsFeatureMethods() cannot return null!");
        }

        protected virtual IItemBucketsFeatureMethods GetItemBucketsFeatureMethods()
        {
            IItemBucketsFeatureMethods methods = Factory.CreateObject("buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods", false) as IItemBucketsFeatureMethods;
            Assert.IsNotNull(methods, "the IItemBucketsFeatureMethods instance was not defined properly in /sitecore/buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods!");
            return methods;
        }

        public override object ComputeFieldValue(IIndexable indexable)
        {
            Item item = indexable as SitecoreIndexableItem;
            if (item == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            Item itemBucketAncestor = GetItemBucketAncestor(item);
            if(itemBucketAncestor == null)
            {

                return null;
            }

            return NormalizeGuid(itemBucketAncestor.ID);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItemBucketAncestor(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if(IsItemBucket(item))
            {
                return null;
            }

            Item itemBucket = ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.GetItemBucket(item);
            if(!IsItemBucket(itemBucket))
            {
                return null;
            }

            return itemBucket;
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if (!ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item))
            {
                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }

        protected virtual string NormalizeGuid(ID id)
        {
            return IdHelper.NormalizeGuid(id);
        }
    }
}

Not to go too much into details of the class above, it will only return an Item Bucket’s Sitecore.Data.ID as a string if the Item lives within an Item Bucket and is not itself an Item Bucket.

If the Item is not within an Item Bucket or is an Item Bucket, null is returned to the caller via the ComputeFieldValue() method.

I then created the following subclass of Sitecore.ContentSearch.SearchTypes.SearchResultItem — this lives in Sitecore.ContentSearch.dll — in order to use the values in the index that the previous Computed Field Index classes returned for their storage in the search index:

using System.ComponentModel;

using Sitecore.ContentSearch;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Converters;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.SearchTypes;
using Sitecore.Data;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.ContentSearch.SearchTypes
{
    public class BucketedSearchResultItem : SearchResultItem
    {
        [IndexField("item_bucket_ancestor_id")]
        [TypeConverter(typeof(IndexFieldIDValueConverter))]
        public ID ItemBucketAncestorId { get; set; }

        [IndexField("is_bucketed")]
        public bool IsBucketed { get; set; }
    }
}

Now, we need a class to get the Bucketed Item count for an Item Bucket. I defined the following interface for class implementations that do just that:

using Sitecore.Data.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items
{
    public interface IBucketedItemsCountProvider
    {
        int GetBucketedItemsCount(Item itemBucket);
    }
}

I then created the following class that implements the interface above:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Xml;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Linq;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Linq.Utilities;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.SearchTypes;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Utilities;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Xml;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.ContentSearch.SearchTypes;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items
{
    public class BucketedItemsCountProvider : IBucketedItemsCountProvider
    {
        protected IDictionary<string, ISearchIndex> SearchIndexMap { get; private set; }

        public BucketedItemsCountProvider()
        {
            SearchIndexMap = CreateNewSearchIndexMap();
        }

        protected virtual IDictionary<string, ISearchIndex> CreateNewSearchIndexMap()
        {
            return new Dictionary<string, ISearchIndex>();
        }

        protected virtual void AddSearchIndexMap(XmlNode configNode)
        {
            if(configNode == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            string databaseName = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("database", configNode, null);
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(databaseName, "The database attribute on the searchIndexMap configuration element cannot be null or the empty string!");
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(!SearchIndexMap.ContainsKey(databaseName), "database", "The searchIndexMap configuration element's database attribute values must be unique!");

            Database database = Factory.GetDatabase(databaseName);
            Assert.IsNotNull(database, string.Format("No database exists with the name of '{0}'! Make sure the database attribute on your searchIndexMap configuration element is set correctly!", databaseName));
            
            string searchIndexName = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("searchIndex", configNode, null);
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(searchIndexName, "The searchIndex attribute on the searchIndexMap configuration element cannot be null or the empty string!");

            ISearchIndex searchIndex = GetSearchIndex(searchIndexName);
            Assert.IsNotNull(searchIndex, string.Format("No search index exists with the name of '{0}'! Make sure the searchIndex attribute on your searchIndexMap configuration element is set correctly", searchIndexName));

            SearchIndexMap.Add(databaseName, searchIndex);
        }

        public virtual int GetBucketedItemsCount(Item bucketItem)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(bucketItem, "bucketItem");

            ISearchIndex searchIndex = GetSearchIndex();
            using (IProviderSearchContext searchContext = searchIndex.CreateSearchContext())
            {
                var predicate = GetSearchPredicate<BucketedSearchResultItem>(bucketItem.ID);
                IQueryable<SearchResultItem> query = searchContext.GetQueryable<BucketedSearchResultItem>().Filter(predicate);
                SearchResults<SearchResultItem> results = query.GetResults();
                return results.Count();
            }
        }

        protected virtual ISearchIndex GetSearchIndex()
        {
            string databaseName = GetContentDatabaseName();
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(databaseName, "The GetContentDatabaseName() method cannot return null or the empty string!");
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(SearchIndexMap.ContainsKey(databaseName), "databaseName", string.Format("There is no ISearchIndex instance mapped to the database: '{0}'!", databaseName));
            return SearchIndexMap[databaseName];
        }

        protected virtual string GetContentDatabaseName()
        {
            Database database = Context.ContentDatabase ?? Context.Database;
            Assert.IsNotNull(database, "Argggggh! There's no content database! Houston, we have a problem!");
            return database.Name;
        }

        protected virtual ISearchIndex GetSearchIndex(string searchIndexName)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(searchIndexName, "searchIndexName");
            return ContentSearchManager.GetIndex(searchIndexName);
        }

        protected virtual Expression<Func<TSearchResultItem, bool>> GetSearchPredicate<TSearchResultItem>(ID itemBucketId) where TSearchResultItem : BucketedSearchResultItem
        {
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(!ID.IsNullOrEmpty(itemBucketId), "itemBucketId", "itemBucketId cannot be null or empty!");
            var predicate = PredicateBuilder.True<TSearchResultItem>();
            predicate = predicate.And(item => item.ItemBucketAncestorId == itemBucketId);
            predicate = predicate.And(item => item.IsBucketed);
            return predicate;
        }
    }
}

Ok, so what’s going on in the class above? The AddSearchIndexMap() method is called by the Sitecore Configuration Factory to add database-to-search-index mappings — have a look at the patch configuration file further below. The code is looking up the appropriate search index for the content/context database.

The GetBucketedItemsCount() method gets the “predicate” from the GetSearchPredicate() method which basically says “Hey, I want an Item that has an ancestor Item Bucket Sitecore.Data.ID which is the same as the Sitecore.Data.ID passed to the method, and also this Item should be bucketed”.

The GetBucketedItemsCount() method then employs the Sitecore.ContentSearch API to get the result-set of the Items for the query, and returns the count of those Items.

Just as Commands, DataViews in Sitecore are instantiated by the CreateObject() method on MainUtil. I want to utilize the Sitecore Configuration Factory instead so that my nested configuration elements are instantiated and injected into my custom DataView. I built the following interface to make that possible:

using System.Collections;

using Sitecore.Collections;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Globalization;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.DataViews
{
    public interface IDataViewBaseExtender
    {
        void FilterItems(ref ArrayList children, string filter);

        void GetChildItems(ItemCollection items, Item item);

        Database GetDatabase();

        Item GetItemFromID(string id, Language language, Version version);

        Item GetParentItem(Item item);

        bool HasChildren(Item item, string filter);

        void Initialize(string parameters);

        bool IsAncestorOf(Item ancestor, Item item);

        void SortItems(ArrayList children, string sortBy, bool sortAscending);
    }
}

All of the methods in the above interface correspond to virtual methods defined on the Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControl.DataViewBase class in Sitecore.Kernel.dll.

I then built the following abstract class which inherits from any DataView class that inherits from Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControl.DataViewBase:

using System.Collections;

using Sitecore.Collections;
using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Globalization;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.DataViews
{
    public abstract class ExtendedDataView<TDataView> : DataViewBase where TDataView : DataViewBase
    {
        protected IDataViewBaseExtender DataViewBaseExtender { get; private set; }

        protected ExtendedDataView()
        {
            DataViewBaseExtender = GetDataViewBaseExtender();
            EnsureDataViewBaseExtender();
        }

        protected virtual IDataViewBaseExtender GetDataViewBaseExtender()
        {
            string configPath = GetDataViewBaseExtenderConfigPath();
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(configPath, "GetDataViewBaseExtenderConfigPath() cannot return null or the empty string!");
            IDataViewBaseExtender dataViewBaseExtender = Factory.CreateObject(configPath, false) as IDataViewBaseExtender;
            Assert.IsNotNull(dataViewBaseExtender, string.Format("the IDataViewBaseExtender instance was not defined properly in '{0}'!", configPath));
            return dataViewBaseExtender;
        }

        protected abstract string GetDataViewBaseExtenderConfigPath();

        protected virtual void EnsureDataViewBaseExtender()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(DataViewBaseExtender, "GetDataViewBaseExtender() cannot return a null IDataViewBaseExtender instance!");
        }

        protected override void FilterItems(ref ArrayList children, string filter)
        {
            DataViewBaseExtender.FilterItems(ref children, filter);
        }

        protected override void GetChildItems(ItemCollection items, Item item)
        {
            DataViewBaseExtender.GetChildItems(items, item);
        }

        public override Database GetDatabase()
        {
            return DataViewBaseExtender.GetDatabase();
        }

        protected override Item GetItemFromID(string id, Language language, Version version)
        {
            return DataViewBaseExtender.GetItemFromID(id, language, version);
        }

        protected override Item GetParentItem(Item item)
        {
            return DataViewBaseExtender.GetParentItem(item);
        }

        public override bool HasChildren(Item item, string filter)
        {
            return DataViewBaseExtender.HasChildren(item, filter);
        }

        public override void Initialize(string parameters)
        {
            DataViewBaseExtender.Initialize(parameters);
        }

        public override bool IsAncestorOf(Item ancestor, Item item)
        {
            return DataViewBaseExtender.IsAncestorOf(ancestor, item);
        }

        protected override void SortItems(ArrayList children, string sortBy, bool sortAscending)
        {
            DataViewBaseExtender.SortItems(children, sortBy, sortAscending);
        }
    }
}

The GetDataViewBaseExtender() method gets the config path for the configuration-defined IDataViewBaseExtender — these IDataViewBaseExtender configuration definitions may or may not have nested configuration elements which will also be instantiated by the Sitecore Configuration Factory — from the abstract GetDataViewBaseExtenderConfigPath() method (subclasses must define this method).

The GetDataViewBaseExtender() then employs the Sitecore Configuration Factory to create this IDataViewBaseExtender instance, and return it to the caller (it’s being called in the class’ constructor).

If the instance is null, an exception is thrown.

All other methods in the above class delegate to methods with the same name and parameters on the IDataViewBaseExtender instance.

I then built the following subclass of the abstract class above:

using Sitecore.Web.UI.HtmlControls;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.DataViews
{
    public class ExtendedMasterDataView : ExtendedDataView<MasterDataView>
    {
        protected override string GetDataViewBaseExtenderConfigPath()
        {
            return "extendedDataViews/extendedMasterDataView";
        }
    }
}

The above class is used for extending the MasterDataView in Sitecore.

It’s now time for the “real deal” DataView that does what we want: show the Bucketed Item counts for Item Buckets. The instance of the following class does just that:

using System.Collections;

using Sitecore.Buckets.Forms;
using Sitecore.Collections;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Fields;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Globalization;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Settings;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.DataViews;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Forms
{
    public class BucketedItemsCountDataView : BucketDataView, IDataViewBaseExtender
    {
        protected IBucketsContentEditorSettings BucketsContentEditorSettings { get; set; }

        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; set; }

        protected IBucketedItemsCountProvider BucketedItemsCountProvider { get; set; }

        protected string SingularBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat { get; set; }

        protected string PluralBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat { get; set; }

        void IDataViewBaseExtender.FilterItems(ref ArrayList children, string filter)
        {
            FilterItems(ref children, filter);
        }

        void IDataViewBaseExtender.GetChildItems(ItemCollection children, Item parent)
        {
            GetChildItems(children, parent);
        }

        protected override void GetChildItems(ItemCollection children, Item parent)
        {
            
            base.GetChildItems(children, parent);
            if(!ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount())
            {
                return;
            }

            for (int i = children.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                Item child = children[i];
                if (IsItemBucket(child))
                {
                    int count = GetBucketedItemsCount(child);
                    Item alteredItem = GetCountDisplayNameItem(child, count);
                    children.RemoveAt(i);
                    children.Insert(i, alteredItem);
                }
            }
        }

        protected virtual bool ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(BucketsContentEditorSettings, "BucketsContentEditorSettings must be defined in configuration!");
            return BucketsContentEditorSettings.ShowBucketedItemsCount;
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, "ItemBucketsFeatureMethods must be set in configuration!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual int GetBucketedItemsCount(Item itemBucket)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(BucketedItemsCountProvider, "BucketedItemsCountProvider must be set in configuration!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(itemBucket, "itemBucket");
            return BucketedItemsCountProvider.GetBucketedItemsCount(itemBucket);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetCountDisplayNameItem(Item item, int count)
        {
            FieldList fields = new FieldList();
            item.Fields.ReadAll();
            
            foreach (Field field in item.Fields)
            {
                fields.Add(field.ID, field.Value);
            }

            int bucketedCount = GetBucketedItemsCount(item);
            string displayName = GetItemNameWithBucketedCount(item, bucketedCount);
            ItemDefinition itemDefinition = new ItemDefinition(item.ID, displayName, item.TemplateID, ID.Null);
            return new Item(item.ID, new ItemData(itemDefinition, item.Language, item.Version, fields), item.Database) { RuntimeSettings = { Temporary = true } };
        }

        protected virtual string GetItemNameWithBucketedCount(Item item, int bucketedCount)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(SingularBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat, "SingularBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat must be set in configuration!");
            Assert.IsNotNull(PluralBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat, "PluralBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat must be set in configuration!");

            if (bucketedCount == 1)
            {
                return ReplaceTokens(SingularBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat, item, bucketedCount);
            }

            return ReplaceTokens(PluralBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat, item, bucketedCount);
        }

        protected virtual string ReplaceTokens(string format, Item item, int bucketedCount)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(format, "format");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            string replaced = format;
            replaced = replaced.Replace("$displayName", item.DisplayName);
            replaced = replaced.Replace("$bucketedCount", bucketedCount.ToString());
            return replaced;
        }

        Database IDataViewBaseExtender.GetDatabase()
        {
            return GetDatabase();
        }

        Item IDataViewBaseExtender.GetItemFromID(string id, Language language, Version version)
        {
            return GetItemFromID(id, language, version);
        }

        Item IDataViewBaseExtender.GetParentItem(Item item)
        {
            return GetParentItem(item);
        }

        bool IDataViewBaseExtender.HasChildren(Item item, string filter)
        {
            return HasChildren(item, filter);
        }

        void IDataViewBaseExtender.Initialize(string parameters)
        {
            Initialize(parameters);
        }

        bool IDataViewBaseExtender.IsAncestorOf(Item ancestor, Item item)
        {
            return IsAncestorOf(ancestor, item);
        }

        void IDataViewBaseExtender.SortItems(ArrayList children, string sortBy, bool sortAscending)
        {
            SortItems(children, sortBy, sortAscending);
        }
    }
}

You might be saying to yourself “Mike, what in the world is going on here?” πŸ˜‰ Let me explain by starting with the GetChildItems() method.

The GetChildItems() method is used to build up the collection of child Items that display in the Content Tree when you expand a parent node. It does this by populating the ItemCollection instance passed to it.

The particular implementation above is delegating to the base class’ implementation to get the list of child Items for display in the Content Tree.

If we should not show the Bucketed Items count — this is determined by the ShouldShowBucketedItemsCount() method which just returns the boolean value set on the ShowBucketedItemsCount property of the injected IBucketsContentEditorSettings instance — the code just exits.

If we are to show the Bucketed Items count, we iterate over the ItemCollection collection and see if any of these child Items are Item Buckets — this is determined by the IsItemBucket() method.

If we find an Item Bucket, we get its count of Bucketed Items via the GetBucketedItemsCount() method which delegates to the GetBucketedItemsCount() method on the injected IBucketedItemsCountProvider instance.

Once we have the count, we call the GetCountDisplayNameItem() method which populates a FieldList collection with all of the fields defined on the Item Bucket; call the GetItemNameWithBucketedCount() method to get the new display name to show in the Content Tree — this method determines which display name format to use depending on whether we should use singular or pluralized messaging, and expands value on tokens via the ReplaceTokens() method — these tokens are defined in the patch configuration file below; creates an ItemDefinition instance so we can set the new display name; and returns a new Sitecore.Data.Items.Item instance to the caller.

No, don’t worry, we aren’t adding a new Item in the content tree but creating a fake “wrapper” of the real one, and replacing this in the ItemCollection.

We also have to fully implement the IDataViewBaseExtender interface. For most methods, I just delegate to the corresponding methods defined on the base class except for the IDataViewBaseExtender.GetChildItems() method which uses the GetChildItems() method defined above.

I then bridged everything above together via the following patch configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <buckets>
      <extendedCommands>
        <toggleBucketedItemsCountCommand type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Commands.ToggleBucketedItemsCountCommand, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="on">
          <BucketsContentEditorSettings ref="buckets/settings/bucketsContentEditorSettings" />
        </toggleBucketedItemsCountCommand>
      </extendedCommands>
      <providers>
        <items>
          <bucketedItemsCountProvider type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items.BucketedItemsCountProvider, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
            <searchIndexMaps hint="raw:AddSearchIndexMap">
              <searchIndexMap database="master" searchIndex="sitecore_master_index" />
              <searchIndexMap database="web" searchIndex="sitecore_web_index" />
            </searchIndexMaps>
          </bucketedItemsCountProvider>
        </items>
      </providers>
      <settings>
        <bucketsContentEditorSettings type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Settings.BucketsContentEditorSettings, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
          <ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer ref="determiners/features/itemBucketsFeatureDeterminer"/>
          <Registry ref="registries/registry" />
          <ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey>/Current_User/UserOptions.View.ShowBucketedItemsCount</ShowBucketedItemsCountRegistryKey>
        </bucketsContentEditorSettings>
      </settings>
    </buckets>
    <commands>
      <command name="contenteditor:togglebucketeditemscount" type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Commands.ExtendedConfigCommand, Sitecore.Sandbox" extendedCommandPath="buckets/extendedCommands/toggleBucketedItemsCountCommand" />
    </commands>
    <contentSearch>
      <indexConfigurations>
        <defaultLuceneIndexConfiguration>
          <fieldMap>
            <fieldNames>
              <field fieldName="item_bucket_ancestor_id" storageType="YES" indexType="TOKENIZED" vectorType="NO" boost="1f" type="System.String" settingType="Sitecore.ContentSearch.LuceneProvider.LuceneSearchFieldConfiguration, Sitecore.ContentSearch.LuceneProvider">
                <analyzer type="Sitecore.ContentSearch.LuceneProvider.Analyzers.LowerCaseKeywordAnalyzer, Sitecore.ContentSearch.LuceneProvider" />
              </field>
              <field fieldName="is_bucketed" storageType="YES" indexType="TOKENIZED" vectorType="NO" boost="1f" type="System.Boolean" settingType="Sitecore.ContentSearch.LuceneProvider.LuceneSearchFieldConfiguration, Sitecore.ContentSearch.LuceneProvider" />
            </fieldNames>
          </fieldMap>
          <documentOptions>
            <fields hint="raw:AddComputedIndexField">
              <field fieldName="item_bucket_ancestor_id">Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.ContentSearch.ComputedFields.ItemBucketAncestorId, Sitecore.Sandbox</field>
              <field fieldName="is_bucketed">Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.ContentSearch.ComputedFields.IsBucketed, Sitecore.Sandbox</field>
            </fields>
          </documentOptions>
        </defaultLuceneIndexConfiguration>
      </indexConfigurations>
    </contentSearch>
    <dataviews>
      <dataview name="Master">
        <patch:attribute name="assembly">Sitecore.Sandbox</patch:attribute>
        <patch:attribute name="type">Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.DataViews.ExtendedMasterDataView</patch:attribute>
      </dataview>
    </dataviews>
    <extendedDataViews>
      <extendedMasterDataView type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Forms.BucketedItemsCountDataView, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
        <BucketsContentEditorSettings ref="buckets/settings/bucketsContentEditorSettings" />
        <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
        <BucketedItemsCountProvider ref="buckets/providers/items/bucketedItemsCountProvider" />
        <SingularBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat>$displayName &lt;span style="font-style: italic; color: blue;"&gt;($bucketedCount bucketed item)&lt;span&gt;</SingularBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat>
        <PluralBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat>$displayName &lt;span style="font-style: italic; color: blue;"&gt;($bucketedCount bucketed items)&lt;span&gt;</PluralBucketedItemsDisplayNameFormat>
      </extendedMasterDataView>
    </extendedDataViews>
    <registries>
      <registry type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Web.UI.HtmlControls.Registries.Registry, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true" />
    </registries>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

bridge-collapse

Let’s see this in action:

bucketed-items-count-testing

As you can see, it is working as intended.

partay-hard

Magical, right?

magic

Well, not really — it just appears that way. πŸ˜‰

magic-not-really

If you have any thoughts on this, please drop a comment.

Prevent Unbucketable Sitecore Items from Being Moved to Bucket Folders

If you’ve been reading my posts lately, you have probably noticed I’ve been having a ton of fun with Sitecore Item Buckets. I absolutely love this feature in Sitecore.

As a matter of, I love Item Buckets so much, I’m doing a presentation on them just next week at the Greater Cincinnati Sitecore Users Group. If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by — even if it’s only to say “Hello”.

Anyways, back to the post.

I noticed the following grey box on the Items Buckets page on the Sitecore Documentation site:

item-buckets-unbucketable-import

This got me thinking: why can’t we build something in Sitecore to prevent this from happening in the first place?

In other words, why can’t we just say “sorry, you can’t move an unbucketable Item into a bucket folder”?

nope

So, that’s what I decided to do — build a solution that prevents this from happening. Let’s have a look at what I came up with.

I first created the following interface for classes whose instances will move a Sitecore item to a destination Item:

using Sitecore.Data.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Items.Movers
{
    public interface IItemMover
    {
        bool DisableSecurity { get; set; }

        bool ShouldBeMoved(Item item, Item destination);

        void Move(Item item, Item destination);
    }
}

I then defined the following class which implements the interface above:

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.SecurityModel;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Items.Movers
{
    public class ItemMover : IItemMover
    {
        public bool DisableSecurity { get; set; }
        
        public virtual bool ShouldBeMoved(Item item, Item destination)
        {
            return item != null && destination != null;
        }

        public virtual void Move(Item item, Item destination)
        {
            if (!ShouldBeMoved(item, destination))
            {
                return;
            }

            if(DisableSecurity)
            {
                MoveWithoutSecurity(item, destination);
                return;
            }

            MoveWithoutSecurity(item, destination);
        }

        protected virtual void MoveWithSecurity(Item item, Item destination)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(destination, "destination");
            item.MoveTo(destination);
        }

        protected virtual void MoveWithoutSecurity(Item item, Item destination)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(destination, "destination");
            using (new SecurityDisabler())
            {
                item.MoveTo(destination);
            }
        }
    }
}

Callers of the above code can move an Item from one location to another with/without Sitecore security in place.

The ShouldBeMoved() above is basically a stub that will allow subclasses to define their own rules on whether an Item should be moved, depending on whatever rules must be met.

I then defined the following subclass of the class above which has its own rules on whether an Item should be moved (i.e. move this unbucketable Item out of a bucket folder if makes its way there):

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Items.Movers;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Items.Movers
{
    public class UnbucketableItemMover : ItemMover
    {
        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; set; }

        public override bool ShouldBeMoved(Item item, Item destination)
        {
            return base.ShouldBeMoved(item, destination)
                    && !IsItemBucketable(item)
                    && IsItemInBucket(item)
                    && !IsItemBucketFolder(item)
                    && IsItemBucketFolder(item.Parent)
                    && IsItemBucket(destination);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucketable(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucketable(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemInBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemContainedWithinBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucketFolder(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucketFolder(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureItemBucketFeatureMethods()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, "ItemBucketsFeatureMethods must be set in configuration!");
        }
    }
}

I’m injecting an instance of an IItemBucketsFeatureMethods class — this interface and its implementation are defined in my previous post; go have a look if you have not read that post so you can be familiar with the IItemBucketsFeatureMethods code — via the Sitecore Configuration Factory which contains common methods I am using in my Item Bucket code solutions (I will be using this in future posts).

The ShouldBeMoved() method basically says that an Item can only be moved when the Item and destination passed aren’t null — this is defined on the base class’ ShouldBeMoved() method; the Item isn’t bucketable; the Item is already in an Item Bucket; the Item isn’t a Bucket Folder; the Item’s parent Item is a Bucket Folder; and the destination is an Item Bucket.

Yes, the above sounds a bit confusing though there is a reason for it — I want to take an unbucketable Item out of a Bucket Folder and move it directly under the Item Bucket instead.

I then created the following class which contains methods that will serve as “item:moved” event handlers:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Events;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Events;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Items.Movers;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Events.Items.Move
{
    public class RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketableHandler
    {
        protected static SynchronizedCollection<ID> ItemsBeingProcessed { get; set; }

        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; set; }

        protected IItemMover UnbucketableItemMover { get; set; }

        protected void OnItemMoved(object sender, EventArgs args)
        {
            Item item = GetItem(args);
            RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketable(item);
        }

        static RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketableHandler()
        {
            ItemsBeingProcessed = new SynchronizedCollection<ID>();
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItem(EventArgs args)
        {
            if (args == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            return Event.ExtractParameter(args, 0) as Item;
        }

        protected void OnItemMovedRemote(object sender, EventArgs args)
        {
            Item item = GetItemRemote(args);
            RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketable(item);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItemRemote(EventArgs args)
        {
            ItemMovedRemoteEventArgs remoteArgs = args as ItemMovedRemoteEventArgs;
            if (remoteArgs == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            return remoteArgs.Item;
        }

        protected virtual void RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketable(Item item)
        {
            if(item == null)
            {
                return;
            }
            
            Item itemBucket = GetItemBucket(item);
            if (itemBucket == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            if(!ShouldBeMoved(item, itemBucket))
            {
                return;
            }

            AddItemBeingProcessed(item);
            MoveUnderItemBucket(item, itemBucket);
            RemoveItemBeingProcessed(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBeingProcessed(Item item)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            return ItemsBeingProcessed.Contains(item.ID);
        }

        protected virtual void AddItemBeingProcessed(Item item)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            ItemsBeingProcessed.Add(item.ID);
        }

        protected virtual void RemoveItemBeingProcessed(Item item)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            ItemsBeingProcessed.Remove(item.ID);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            if(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods == null || item == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.GetItemBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool ShouldBeMoved(Item item, Item itemBucket)
        {
            if(UnbucketableItemMover == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            return UnbucketableItemMover.ShouldBeMoved(item, itemBucket);
        }

        protected virtual void MoveUnderItemBucket(Item item, Item itemBucket)
        {
            if (UnbucketableItemMover == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            UnbucketableItemMover.Move(item, itemBucket);
        }
    }
}

Both the OnItemMoved() and OnItemMovedRemote() methods extract the moved Item from their specific methods for getting the Item from the EventArgs instance. If that Item is null, the code exits.

Both methods pass their Item instance to the RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketable() method which ultimately attempts to grab an Item Bucket ancestor of the Item via the GetItemBucket() method. If no Item Bucket instance is returned, the code exits.

If an Item Bucket was found, the RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketable() method ascertains whether the Item should be moved — it makes a call to the ShouldBeMoved() method which just delegates to the IItemMover instance injected in via the Sitecore Configuration Factory (have a look at the patch configuration file below).

If the Item should not be moved, then the code exits.

If it should be moved, it is then passed to the MoveUnderItemBucket() method which delegates to the Move() method on the IItemMover instance.

You might be asking “Mike, what’s up with the ItemsBeingProcessed SynchronizedCollection of Item IDs?” I’m using this collection to maintain which Items are currently being moved so we don’t have racing conditions in code.

You might be thinking “Great, we’re done!”

no

We can’t just move an Item from one destination to another, especially when the user selected the first destination. We should let the user know that we will need to move the Item as it is unbucketable. Let’s not be evil.

evil

I created the following class whose Process() method will serve as a custom processor for both the <uiDragItemTo> and <uiMoveItems> pipelines of the Sitecore Client:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Text;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.MoveItems
{
    public class ConfirmMoveOfUnbucketableItem
    {
        protected string ItemIdsParameterName { get; set; }

        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; set; }

        protected string ConfirmationMessageFormat { get; set; }

        public void Process(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            IEnumerable<string> itemIds = GetItemIds(args);
            if (itemIds == null || !itemIds.Any() || itemIds.Count() > 1)
            {
                return;
            }
            
            string targetId = GetTargetId(args);
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(targetId))
            {
                return;
            }

            Database database = GetDatabase(args);
            if (database == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            Item targetItem = GetItem(database, targetId);
            if (targetItem == null || !IsItemBucketOrIsItemInBucket(targetItem))
            {
                return;
            }

            Item item = GetItem(database, itemIds.First());
            if (item == null || IsItemBucketable(item))
            {
                return;
            }

            Item itemBucket = GetItemBucket(targetItem);
            if (itemBucket == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            SetTokenValues(args, item, itemBucket);
            ConfirmMove(args);
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<string> GetItemIds(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            string itemIdsParameterName = GetItemIdsParameterName(args);
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(itemIdsParameterName, "GetItemIdParameterName() cannot return null or the empty string!");
            return new ListString(itemIdsParameterName, '|');
        }

        protected virtual string GetItemIdsParameterName(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(ItemIdsParameterName, "ItemIdParameterName must be set in configuration!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            return args.Parameters[ItemIdsParameterName];
        }

        protected virtual string GetTargetId(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            return args.Parameters["target"];
        }

        protected virtual Database GetDatabase(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            return Factory.GetDatabase(args.Parameters["database"]);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItem(Database database, string itemId)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(database, "database");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(itemId, "itemId");
            try
            {
                return database.GetItem(itemId);

            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }

            return null;
        }
        
        protected virtual bool IsItemBucketOrIsItemInBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return IsItemBucket(item) || IsItemInBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemInBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemContainedWithinBucket(item);
        }

        protected virtual bool IsItemBucketable(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucketable(item);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if(!ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item))
            {
                return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.GetItemBucket(item);
            }

            return item;
        }

        protected virtual void SetTokenValues(ClientPipelineArgs args, Item item, Item itemBucket)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(itemBucket, "itemBucket");
            args.Parameters["$itemName"] = item.Name;
            args.Parameters["$itemBucketName"] = itemBucket.Name;
            args.Parameters["$itemBucketFullPath"] = itemBucket.Paths.FullPath;
        }

        protected virtual void ConfirmMove(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            if(args.IsPostBack)
            {
                if (args.Result == "yes")
                {
                    ClearResult(args);
                    return;
                }

                if (args.Result == "no")
                {
                    args.AbortPipeline();
                    return;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                SheerResponse.Confirm(GetConfirmationMessage(args));
                args.WaitForPostBack();    
            }   
        }

        protected virtual void ClearResult(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            args.Result = string.Empty;
            args.IsPostBack = false;
        }

        protected virtual string GetConfirmationMessage(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(ConfirmationMessageFormat, "ConfirmationMessageFormat must be set in configuration!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            return ReplaceTokens(ConfirmationMessageFormat, args);
        }

        protected virtual string ReplaceTokens(string messageFormat, ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(messageFormat, "messageFormat");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            
            string message = messageFormat;
            message = message.Replace("$itemName", args.Parameters["$itemName"]);
            message = message.Replace("$itemBucketName", args.Parameters["$itemBucketName"]);
            message = message.Replace("$itemBucketFullPath", args.Parameters["$itemBucketFullPath"]);
            return message;
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, "ItemBucketsFeatureMethods must be set in configuration!");
        }
    }
}

The Process() method above gets the Item ID for the Item that is being moved; the Item ID for the destination Item — this is referred to as the “target” in the code above; gets the Database instance of where we are moving this Item; the instances of both the Item and target Item; determines if the Target Item is a Bucket Folder or an Item Bucket; determines if the Item is unbucketable; and then the Item Bucket (this could be the target Item).

If any of of the instances above are null, the code exits.

If the Item is unbucketable but is being moved to a Bucket Folder or Item Bucket, we prompt the user with a confirmation dialog asking him/her whether he/she should like to continue given that the Item will be moved directly under the Item Bucket.

If the user clicks the ‘Ok’ button, the Item is moved. Otherwise, the pipeline is aborted and the Item will not be moved at all.

I then pieced all of the above together via the following patch configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <buckets>
      <movers>
        <items>
          <unbucketableItemMover type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Items.Movers.UnbucketableItemMover, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
            <DisableSecurity>true</DisableSecurity>
            <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          </unbucketableItemMover>
        </items>
      </movers>
    </buckets>
    <events>
      <event name="item:moved">
        <handler type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Events.Items.Move.RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketableHandler, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="OnItemMoved">
          <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          <UnbucketableItemMover ref="buckets/movers/items/unbucketableItemMover" />
        </handler>  
      </event>
      <event name="item:moved:remote">
        <handler type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Events.Items.Move.RemoveFromBucketFolderIfNotBucketableHandler, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="OnItemMovedRemote">
          <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          <UnbucketableItemMover ref="buckets/movers/items/unbucketableItemMover" />
        </handler>
      </event>
    </events>
    <processors>
      <uiDragItemTo>
        <processor patch:before="processor[@type='Sitecore.Buckets.Pipelines.UI.ItemDrag, Sitecore.Buckets' and @method='Execute']"
                   type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.MoveItems.ConfirmMoveOfUnbucketableItem, Sitecore.Sandbox" mode="on">
          <ItemIdsParameterName>id</ItemIdsParameterName>
          <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          <ConfirmationMessageFormat>You are attempting to move the non-bucketable Item: $itemName to a bucket folder. If you continue, it will be moved directly under the Item Bucket: $itemBucketName ($itemBucketFullPath). Do you wish to continue?</ConfirmationMessageFormat>
        </processor>
      </uiDragItemTo>
      <uiMoveItems>
        <processor patch:before="processor[@type='Sitecore.Buckets.Pipelines.UI.ItemMove, Sitecore.Buckets' and @method='Execute']"
                     type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.MoveItems.ConfirmMoveOfUnbucketableItem, Sitecore.Sandbox" mode="on">
          <ItemIdsParameterName>items</ItemIdsParameterName>
          <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          <ConfirmationMessageFormat>You are attempting to move the non-bucketable Item: $itemName to a bucket folder. If you continue, it will be moved directly under the Item Bucket: $itemBucketName ($itemBucketFullPath). Do you wish to continue?</ConfirmationMessageFormat>
        </processor>
      </uiMoveItems>
    </processors>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

Let’s see how we did.

jenga-topple

Let’s move this unbucketable Item to an Item Bucket:

move-unbucketable-1

Yes, I’m sure I’m sure:

move-unbucketable-2

I was then prompted with the confirmation dialog as expected:

move-unbucketable-3

As you can see, the Item was placed directly under the Item Bucket:

move-unbucketable-4

If you have any thoughts on this, please drop a comment.

thats-all-folks

Prevent Duplicate Names of Bucketed Sitecore Items

In my previous post, I gave a solution that removes names of Bucket Folder Items from URLs in Sitecore, and also resolves those same URLs when they are called up in a browser.

However, that solution wasn’t complete — code is needed to ensure Bucketed Item names are unique given the solution assumes Bucketed Item names are unique (code in that solution uses the Sitecore.ContentSearch API to find an Item by name within an Item Bucket, and if there are two or more Items with the same name, only one will be returned — this will prevent the resolution of URLs for those other Bucketed page Items).

I decided to take up the challenge on continuing that solution over this previous weekend, and share what I built.

challenge

One thing to note: the solution that follows is not a complete solution for preventing duplicate Bucketed Item names as such a post could go on for ages — actually, I probably would still be writing the code for it. I leave the rest for you guys to do as a homework assignment. πŸ˜‰

Cat-ate-my-homework-GIF

I first defined the following interface to centralize common methods I have been using in my Sitecore Item Buckets code (I will be reusing this same interface and its implementation in future blog posts):

using Sitecore.Data.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods
{
    public interface IItemBucketsFeatureMethods
    {
        bool IsItemBucketFolder(Item item);
        
        bool IsItemContainedWithinBucket(Item item);
        
        bool IsItemBucketable(Item item);
        
        Item GetItemBucket(Item item);

        bool IsItemBucket(Item item);

        bool HasBucketedItemWithName(Item itemBucket, string itemName);
    }
}

The following class implements the interface above:

using Sitecore.Buckets.Extensions;
using Sitecore.Buckets.Managers;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods
{
    public class ItemBucketsFeatureMethods : IItemBucketsFeatureMethods
    {
        private IFindBucketedItemProvider FindBucketedItemProvider { get; set; }

        public virtual bool IsItemBucketFolder(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return item.IsABucketFolder();
        }

        public virtual bool IsItemContainedWithinBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return BucketManager.IsItemContainedWithinBucket(item);
        }

        public virtual bool IsItemBucketable(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return item.IsItemBucketable();
        }

        public virtual Item GetItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            Item ancestor = item.GetParentBucketItemOrParent();
            if (!IsItemBucket(ancestor))
            {
                return null;
            }

            return ancestor;
        }

        public virtual bool IsItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            return item.IsABucket();
        }

        public virtual bool HasBucketedItemWithName(Item itemBucket, string itemName)
        {
            EnsureFindBucketedItemProvider();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(itemBucket, "itemBucket");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(itemName, "itemName");
            Item item = FindBucketedItemProvider.FindBucketedItemByName(itemBucket, itemName);
            if(item == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureFindBucketedItemProvider()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(FindBucketedItemProvider, "FindBucketedItemProvider must be set in configuration!");
        }
    }
}

I’m not going to go into details of the code above as it is self-explanatory.

However, I do want to call out that I am reusing the IFindBucketedItemProvider code from my previous post. I advise having a look at that code before moving forward.

I then defined the following class whose Process() method will serve as a processor of the <uiDragItemTo> and
<uiMoveItems> pipelines of the Sitecore Client:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Text;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.MoveItems
{
    public class HandleDuplicateBucketedItemName
    {
        protected string ItemIdsParameterName { get; set; }

        protected IItemBucketsFeatureMethods ItemBucketsFeatureMethods { get; set; }

        protected string RenameItemMessage { get; set; }

        public void Process(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            IEnumerable<string> itemIds = GetItemIds(args);
            if (itemIds == null || !itemIds.Any() || itemIds.Count() > 1)
            {
                return;
            }
            
            string targetId = GetTargetId(args);
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(targetId))
            {
                return;
            }

            Database database = GetDatabase(args);
            if (database == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            Item targetItem = GetItem(database, targetId);
            if (targetItem == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            Item item = GetItem(database, itemIds.First());
            if (item == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            Item itemBucket = GetItemBucket(targetItem);
            if (itemBucket == null || !HasBucketedItemWithName(itemBucket, item.Name))
            {
                return;
            }

            PromptRenameItem(args, item);
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<string> GetItemIds(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            string itemIdsParameterName = GetItemIdsParameterName(args);
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(itemIdsParameterName, "GetItemIdParameterName() cannot return null or the empty string!");
            return new ListString(itemIdsParameterName, '|');
        }

        protected virtual string GetItemIdsParameterName(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(ItemIdsParameterName, "ItemIdParameterName must be set in configuration!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            return args.Parameters[ItemIdsParameterName];
        }

        protected virtual string GetTargetId(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            return args.Parameters["target"];
        }

        protected virtual Database GetDatabase(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Parameters, "args.Parameters");
            return Factory.GetDatabase(args.Parameters["database"]);
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItem(Database database, string itemId)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(database, "database");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(itemId, "itemId");
            try
            {
                return database.GetItem(itemId);

            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }

            return null;
        }

        protected virtual Item GetItemBucket(Item item)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if(!ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.IsItemBucket(item))
            {
                return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.GetItemBucket(item);
            }

            return item;
        }

        protected virtual bool HasBucketedItemWithName(Item itemBucket, string bucketedItemName)
        {
            EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(itemBucket, "itemBucket");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(bucketedItemName, "bucketedItemName");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureMethods.HasBucketedItemWithName(itemBucket, bucketedItemName);
        }

        protected virtual void PromptRenameItem(ClientPipelineArgs args, Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if (args.IsPostBack)
            {
                if(!args.HasResult)
                {
                    args.AbortPipeline();
                    return;
                }

                GetProposedValidItemName(args.Result);
                RenameItem(item, GetProposedValidItemName(args.Result));
                ClearResult(args);
            }
            else
            {
                SheerResponse.Input(GetRenameItemMessage(), string.Empty);
                args.WaitForPostBack();    
            }   
        }

        protected virtual void ClearResult(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            args.Result = string.Empty;
            args.IsPostBack = false;
        }

        protected virtual string GetProposedValidItemName(string itemName)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(itemName, "itemName");
            return ItemUtil.ProposeValidItemName(itemName);
        }

        protected virtual void RenameItem(Item item, string name)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(name, "name");
            using (new EditContext(item, false, true))
            {
                item.Name = name;
            }
        }

        protected virtual string GetRenameItemMessage()
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(RenameItemMessage, "RenameItemMessage must be set in configuration!");
            return RenameItemMessage;
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureItemBucketsFeatureMethods()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, "ItemBucketsFeatureMethods must be set in configuration!");
        }
    }
}

The Process() method above basically gets the Item IDs of the Items that are moving from the Parameters collection on the arguments object passed to it — these are stored under different keys in the Parameters collection by the <uiDragItemTo> and <uiMoveItems> pipelines, so I’m letting the Sitecore Configuration Factory pass in the name of that parameter for each (see the patch configuration file below).

If more than one Item ID is returned, the code exits.

The Process() method then gets the target Item’s ID; the Database instance; the target Item; and the instance of the Item we are moving. If any of these are null, it exits.

The code then attempts to get the Item Bucket for the target Item — this is done via the GetItemBucket() method which just delegates to the GetItemBucket() method on the IItemBucketsFeatureMethods instance, or returns the passed Item if it is an Item Bucket. If the returned Item is null, the code exits.

The Process() method then calls the HasBucketedItemWithName() — this method just makes a call to a method with the same name on the ItemBucketsFeatureMethods instance — to see if there is another Bucketed Item within the Item Bucket with the same name. If one is not found, we prompt the user for a new Item name, and rename the Item if one is supplied. If no Item name is supplied, we abort the pipeline completely to prevent the user from moving forward.

I do want to highlight one more thing. the RenameItem() method uses a Sitecore.Data.Items.EditContext instance when changing the Item name. I decided to use an instance of this class to have this change be silent and not log any update statistics as this was causing the Item to become un-bucketable after it was moved (no clue as to why this would happen).

I then plugged-in all of the code above via the following patch configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <buckets>
      <methods>
        <itemBucketsFeatureMethods type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Util.Methods.ItemBucketsFeatureMethods, Sitecore.Sandbox">
          <FindBucketedItemProvider ref="buckets/providers/items/findBucketedItemProvider" />
        </itemBucketsFeatureMethods>
      </methods>
    </buckets>
    <processors>
      <uiDragItemTo>
        <processor patch:before="processor[@type='Sitecore.Buckets.Pipelines.UI.ItemDrag, Sitecore.Buckets' and @method='Execute']"
                   type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.MoveItems.HandleDuplicateBucketedItemName, Sitecore.Sandbox" mode="on">
          <ItemIdsParameterName>id</ItemIdsParameterName>
          <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          <RenameItemMessage>Duplicate bucketed Item names are not allowed.  Please enter in a new name for the item:</RenameItemMessage>
        </processor>
      </uiDragItemTo>
      <uiMoveItems>
        <processor patch:before="processor[@type='Sitecore.Buckets.Pipelines.UI.ItemMove, Sitecore.Buckets' and @method='Execute']"
                     type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.MoveItems.HandleDuplicateBucketedItemName, Sitecore.Sandbox" mode="on">
          <ItemIdsParameterName>items</ItemIdsParameterName>
          <ItemBucketsFeatureMethods ref="buckets/methods/itemBucketsFeatureMethods" />
          <RenameItemMessage>Duplicate bucketed Item names are not allowed.  Please enter in a new name for the item:</RenameItemMessage>
        </processor>
      </uiMoveItems>
    </processors>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

plugged-in

Let’s take this for a spin.

Let’s test this out by dragging an Item to an Item Bucket that has a bucketed Item with the same name:

unique-name-move-1

Of course, I do:

unique-name-move-2

I gave it a unique name:

unique-name-move-3

As you can see, the Item was renamed and then moved:

unique-name-move-4

One thing to note: the Item will not be moved if the user clicks the ‘Cancel’ button in the dialog that asks for a new name.

Moreover, the above code only works when moving Items in the Sitecore Client. These pipeline processors will not run when moving Items via Sitecore API code (you’ll have to tap into one of the “move” related events, instead).

I’m going to omit sharing my testing of the “Move To” piece of the code above as it is using the same code. Trust me, it works. πŸ˜‰

If you have any thoughts on this, please drop a comment.

A Sitecore Item Buckets GutterRenderer to Convey Which Algorithm Was Used for Creating Bucket Folders

In my previous post, I gave a solution which I leverages the Sitecore Rules Engine to create a custom Item Buckets folder structure for storing bucketable Items.

Last night, I had a thought: what if you needed to know which “algorithm” created a given bucket folder structure for an Item Bucket? How could we go about conveying this type of information?

Immediately, the Sitecore Gutter came to mind — it’s a great way to communicate this type of information visually.

mind-outta-gutter

Before I move forward on the solution I started last night and completed today, let me explain what the Sitecore Gutter is, just in case you are unfamiliar with this feature.

The Sitecore Gutter lives here in the Content Editor:

smart-bucket-gutter-sitecore-gutter

If you right-click in this area, you get a context menu to turn on/off Gutter indicators:

smart-gutter-sitecore-gutter-context-menu

I turned on the Item Buckets Gutter indicator, and now can see which Items are Buckets:

smart-gutter-turn-on-buckets-gutter

There is a huge body of blog posts out on the interwebs which give examples on adding to the Sitecore Gutter. Here are a few posts from some fellow Sitecore MVPs which I highly recommend reading (in order of publish date):

I also wrote a post on how to add to the Sitecore Gutter using the Sitecore PowerShell Extensions module. I recommend having a look at that as well. πŸ˜‰

Now that we are well-versed — or “wicked smaht” as we Bostonians would alternatively say — on what the Sitecore Gutter is, let’s move on to the solution I came up with.

three-stooges-ejoomicated

Just a “heads up”: there is a lot of code in this solution so don’t freak out and/or get too overwhelmed. Stay the course. πŸ˜‰

curly-bug-out

I first explored Sitecore.Buckets.Gutters.BucketGutter in Sitecore.Buckets.dll to see if I should take note of anything special I need to know about when creating custom Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters.GutterRenderer — this lives in Sitecore.Kernel.dll and needs to be subclassed when adding to the Sitecore Gutter — subclasses for Item Buckets.

I noticed there is code in there which ascertains whether the Item Buckets feature is turned on/off, and obviously returns a null instance of Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters.GutterIconDescriptor — this lives in Sitecore.Kernel.dll — via its GetIconDescriptor() method.

I decided I needed to a way to also ascertain this. I came up with the following interface for classes that determined whether a feature is enabled or not:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Determiners.Features
{
    public interface IFeatureDeterminer
    {
        bool IsEnabled();
    }
}

I then implemented the above interface with the following class:

using Sitecore.ContentSearch;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Utilities;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Determiners.Features;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Determiners.Features
{
    public class ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer : IFeatureDeterminer
    {
        public virtual bool IsEnabled()
        {
            return ContentSearchManager.Locator.GetInstance<IContentSearchConfigurationSettings>().ItemBucketsEnabled();
        }
    }
}

The code in the IsEnabled() method basically returns a boolean indicating whether the Item Buckets feature is turned on/off.

We now need classes whose instances can ascertain whether a bucketed Item’s path matches the paths generated by the bucketing algorithms they represent. I created the following class whose instances would serve as a parameters object to these objects:

using System;

using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers
{
    public class BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters
    {
        public Item BucketItem { get; set; }

        public Item BucketedItem { get; set; }

        public DateTime CreationDateOfNewItem { get; set; }
    }
}

We’re just going to pass the Item Bucket, the bucketed Item and the creation date of the bucketed Item.

Next, we need those objects that ascertain whether a given Item Bucket uses a particular bucketing algorithm for its folder structure. I created the following interface for classes whose instances do just that:


namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers
{
    public interface IBucketFolderPathAscertainer
    {
        string GetIcon();

        string GetToolTip();

        bool IsFolderPathMatch(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters);
    }
}

After implementing two classes which implemented the interface above, I noticed some code similarities between them, and decided to employ Martin Fowler‘s refactoring technique Pull Up Method to move up these code similarities into a base class — I highly recommend reading his book Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code which discusses this refactoring technique as well as a host of others — to make it easier for creating future subclasses and to hopefully abate the chances of code duplication. That exercise gave birth to the following abstract class:

using System;

using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers
{
    public abstract class BucketFolderPathAscertainer : IBucketFolderPathAscertainer
    {
        private string icon;
        protected string Icon
        {
            get
            {
                Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(icon, "Icon must be set in configuration!");
                return icon;
            }
            set
            {
                Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(value, "Icon must be set in configuration!");
                icon = value;
            }
        }

        private string toolTip;
        protected string ToolTip
        {
            get
            {
                Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(toolTip, "ToolTip must be set in configuration!");
                return toolTip;
            }
            set
            {
                Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(value, "ToolTip must be set in configuration!");
                toolTip = value;
            }
        }
        
        public virtual string GetIcon()
        {
            return Icon;
        }

        public virtual string GetToolTip()
        {
            return ToolTip;
        }

        public bool IsFolderPathMatch(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters)
        {
            EnsureParameters(parameters);
            ID settingsItemID = GetSettingsItemID();
            Assert.IsTrue(!ID.IsNullOrEmpty(settingsItemID), "GetSettingsItemID() cannot return null or empty!");
            Item settingsItem = parameters.BucketItem.Database.GetItem(settingsItemID);
            Assert.IsNotNull(settingsItem, string.Format("Setting Item does not exist! Make sure it exists! Item ID: {0}", settingsItemID.ToString()));

            string resolvedPath = GetResolvedPath(parameters, settingsItem);
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(resolvedPath))
            {
                return false;
            }

            return IsPathMatch(parameters, resolvedPath);
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureParameters(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(parameters, "parameters");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(parameters.BucketItem, "parameters.BucketItem");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(parameters.BucketedItem, "parameters.BucketedItem");
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(parameters.BucketItem.Database == parameters.BucketedItem.Database, "parameters.BucketItem.Database", "parameters.BucketItem.Database and parameters.BucketedItem.Database must be the same database");
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(parameters.BucketItem.Axes.IsAncestorOf(parameters.BucketedItem), "parameters.BucketItem", string.Format("parameters.BucketItem", "Bucket Item: {0} must be an ancestor of Bucketed Item: {1}", parameters.BucketItem.ID.ToString(), parameters.BucketedItem.ID.ToString()));
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(parameters.BucketedItem, "parameters.BucketedItem");
        }

        protected virtual ID GetSettingsItemID()
        {
            return Sitecore.Buckets.Util.Constants.SettingsItemId;
        }

        protected abstract string GetResolvedPath(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters, Item settingsItem);

        protected virtual bool IsPathMatch(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters, string resolvedPath)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(resolvedPath))
            {
                return false;
            }

            string bucketedFolderPath = parameters.BucketedItem.Paths.ParentPath.Replace(parameters.BucketItem.Paths.FullPath, string.Empty);
            if(bucketedFolderPath.StartsWith("/"))
            {
                bucketedFolderPath = bucketedFolderPath.Substring(1);
            }

            return string.Equals(bucketedFolderPath, resolvedPath, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
        }
    }
}

The Icon and ToolTip property values in the above class live in the patch configuration file further down in this post. The Sitecore Configuration Factory will inject those values into these properties, and the GetIcon() and GetToolTip() will return the values housed in the Icon and ToolTip properties, respectively.

The IsFolderPathMatch() gets the settingsItem Item instance — this Item lives in /sitecore/system/Settings/Buckets/Item Buckets Settings in Sitecore — which is needed by the GetResolvedPath() method — this method is declared abstract and must be implemented by subclasses — whose job it is to get the bucketed Item’s folder path via the algorithm which the subclass implementation represents.

When the algorithm path is return, it is then passed to the IsPathMatch() method which determines if there is a match. If there is a match, true is returned to the caller of the IsFolderPathMatch() method; false is returned otherwise.

The class above combined with its subclasses would be an example of the Template method design pattern in action.

Now, we need a subclass of the above to determine if a bucketed Item’s path was generated by the Sitecore Rules Engine. Since we don’t want the Rules Engine to evaluate the rules defined on /sitecore/system/Settings/Buckets/Item Buckets Settings for the bucketed Item given the Item Bucket’s current state — its “when” Condition will most likely evaluate to false — we need a way to trick the Rules Engine. I came up with the following Condition class that always evaluates to true:

using Sitecore.Rules;
using Sitecore.Rules.Conditions;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Rules
{
    public class AlwaysTrueWhenCondition<TRuleContext> : WhenCondition<TRuleContext> where TRuleContext : RuleContext
    {
        protected override bool Execute(TRuleContext ruleContext)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
}

There isn’t much going on in the above class. Its Execute() method always returns true.

The following subclass of the BucketFolderPathAscertainer class determines if a bucketed Item’s path was generated by the Sitecore Rules Engine:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Buckets.Rules.Bucketing;
using Sitecore.Rules;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Rules;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers
{
    public class RulesDefinedBucketFolderPathAscertainer : BucketFolderPathAscertainer
    {
        protected override string GetResolvedPath(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters, Item settingsItem)
        {
            string bucketRulesFieldId = GetBucketRulesFieldId();
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(bucketRulesFieldId, "GetBucketRulesFieldId() cannot return null or empty!");
            BucketingRuleContext ruleContext = CreateNewBucketingRuleContext(parameters);
            RuleList<BucketingRuleContext> rules = GetRuleList<BucketingRuleContext>(settingsItem, bucketRulesFieldId);
            SetAlwaysTrueWhenConditions(rules.Rules);
            if (rules == null)
            {
                return string.Empty;
            }

            try
            {
                rules.Run(ruleContext);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }

            return ruleContext.ResolvedPath;
        }

        protected virtual string GetBucketRulesFieldId()
        {
            return Sitecore.Buckets.Util.Constants.BucketRulesFieldId;
        }

        protected virtual BucketingRuleContext CreateNewBucketingRuleContext(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters)
        {
            return new BucketingRuleContext(parameters.BucketedItem.Database, parameters.BucketItem.ID, parameters.BucketedItem.ID, parameters.BucketedItem.Name,
                            parameters.BucketedItem.TemplateID, parameters.CreationDateOfNewItem)
            {
                NewItemId = parameters.BucketedItem.ID,
                CreationDate = parameters.CreationDateOfNewItem
            };
        }

        protected virtual RuleList<T> GetRuleList<T>(Item settingsItem, string bucketRulesFieldId) where T : BucketingRuleContext
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(settingsItem, "settingsItem");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(bucketRulesFieldId, "bucketRulesFieldId");
            return RuleFactory.GetRules<T>(new[] { settingsItem }, bucketRulesFieldId);
        }

        protected virtual void SetAlwaysTrueWhenConditions<TRuleContext>(IEnumerable<Rule<TRuleContext>> rules) where TRuleContext : RuleContext
        {
            foreach(Rule<TRuleContext> rule in rules)
            {
                rule.Condition = CreateNewAlwaysTrueWhenCondition<TRuleContext>();
            }
        }

        protected virtual AlwaysTrueWhenCondition<TRuleContext> CreateNewAlwaysTrueWhenCondition<TRuleContext>() where TRuleContext : RuleContext
        {
            return new AlwaysTrueWhenCondition<TRuleContext>();
    }
    }
}

I’m not going to go too much into all the methods of this class given that most of the magic happens in the GetResolvedPath() method. It basically replaces all Conditions in the rules Sitecore.Rules.RulesList instance with an instance of the Condition class above; calls the Rules Engine API to evaluate the rules defined on the settingsItem instance though with the Conditions always returning true; and returns the resolved path to the caller.

The following class which also subclasses the BucketFolderPathAscertainer class — if I only had a dollar for every instance of the word “class” or “subclass” in this post — basically wraps an Sitecore.Buckets.Util.IDynamicBucketFolderPath instance — ahem, I mean employs the Adapter design pattern — where its GetResolvedPath() method delegates a call to the IDynamicBucketFolderPath instances GetFolderPath() method:

using Sitecore.Buckets.Util;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers
{
    public class DynamicBucketFolderPathPathAscertainer : BucketFolderPathAscertainer
    {
        private IDynamicBucketFolderPath PathResolver { get; set; }

        protected override string GetResolvedPath(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters, Item settingsItem)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(PathResolver, "The IDynamicBucketFolderPath instance named PathResolver must be set in configuration!");
            return PathResolver.GetFolderPath(parameters.BucketItem.Database, parameters.BucketedItem.Name, parameters.BucketedItem.TemplateID,
                                                                parameters.BucketedItem.ID, parameters.BucketItem.ID, parameters.CreationDateOfNewItem);
        }
    }
}

You might be asking “what are we using the above class for?” Well, we are going to inject an instance of Sitecore.Buckets.Util.DateBasedFolderPath into the PathResolver property via the Sitecore Configuration Factory (please see the patch configuration file further down in this post).

I thought it might be cumbersome for a class to make calls to every single IBucketFolderPathAscertainer instance — sure, we only have two above but just think about how messy things will quickly progress if more are added. I decided I would utilize the Composite design pattern via the following class:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Xml;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers
{
    
    public class CompositeBucketFolderPathAscertainer : IBucketFolderPathAscertainer
    {
        private string Icon { get; set; }

        private string ToolTip { get; set; }

        private List<IBucketFolderPathAscertainer> FolderPathAscertainers { get; set; }

        public CompositeBucketFolderPathAscertainer()
        {
            FolderPathAscertainers = new List<IBucketFolderPathAscertainer>();
        }

        public string GetIcon()
        {
            return Icon;
        }

        protected virtual void SetIcon(string icon)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(icon, "icon");
            Icon = icon;
        }

        public string GetToolTip()
        {
            return ToolTip;
        }

        protected virtual void SetToolTip(string toolTip)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(toolTip, "toolTip");
            ToolTip = toolTip;
        }

        public bool IsFolderPathMatch(BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters)
        {
            if(FolderPathAscertainers == null || !FolderPathAscertainers.Any())
            {
                return false;
            }

            foreach(IBucketFolderPathAscertainer ascertainer in FolderPathAscertainers)
            {
                if(ascertainer.IsFolderPathMatch(parameters))
                {
                    SetIcon(ascertainer.GetIcon());
                    SetToolTip(ascertainer.GetToolTip());
                    return true;
                }
            }

            return false;
        }

        protected virtual void AddFolderPathAscertainer(XmlNode configNode)
        {
            if(configNode == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            IBucketFolderPathAscertainer ascertainer = Factory.CreateObject(configNode, false) as IBucketFolderPathAscertainer;
            Assert.IsNotNull(ascertainer, "An IBucketFolderPathAscertainer was not defined correctly in configuration!");
            FolderPathAscertainers.Add(ascertainer);
        }
    }
}

All configuration-defined IBucketFolderPathAscertainer instances will be added to the FolderPathAscertainers List property via the AddFolderPathAscertainer() method (have a look at the configuration file below to see the AddFolderPathAscertainer() method being there for the Sitecore Configuration Factory to use).

The IsFolderPathMatch() method will then iterate over all IBucketFolderPathAscertainer instances and try to find a match. If a match is found, the instance of the class above will grab and save local copies of that IBucketFolderPathAscertainer instance’s Icon and Tooltip values, and then return true. If no match was found, it returns false.

Now, we need a way to grab one bucketed Item for an Item Bucket. I defined the following interface for a class whose instance will return one Item given another Item:

using Sitecore.Data.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers.Items
{
    public interface IItemProvider
    {
        Item GetItem(Item item);
    }
}

The following class implements the interface above:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

using Sitecore.ContentSearch;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Linq;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Linq.Utilities;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.SearchTypes;
using Sitecore.ContentSearch.Utilities;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers.Items;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items
{
    public class BucketedItemProvider : IItemProvider
    {
        private string BucketFolderTemplateId { get; set; }

        private string SearchIndexName { get; set; }

        private ISearchIndex searchIndex;
        private ISearchIndex SearchIndex
        {
            get
            {
                if (searchIndex == null && !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(SearchIndexName))
                {
                    searchIndex = GetSearchIndex(SearchIndexName);
                }

                return searchIndex;
            }
        }

        public virtual Item GetItem(Item bucketItem)
        {
            ID bucketFolderTemplateId;
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(ID.TryParse(BucketFolderTemplateId, out bucketFolderTemplateId), "BucketFolderTemplateId", "BucketFolderTemplateId cannot be empty and must be a Sitecore.Data.ID! Check its configuration setting!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(bucketItem, "bucketItem");
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(SearchIndexName, "SearchIndexName is empty. Double-check its configuration setting!");
            Assert.IsNotNull(SearchIndex, "SearchIndex is null. Double-check the SearchIndexName configuration setting!");

            using (IProviderSearchContext searchContext = SearchIndex.CreateSearchContext())
            {
                var predicate = GetSearchPredicate<SearchResultItem>(bucketItem.ID, bucketFolderTemplateId);
                IQueryable<SearchResultItem> query = searchContext.GetQueryable<SearchResultItem>().Filter(predicate);
                SearchResults<SearchResultItem> results = query.GetResults();
                if (results.Count() < 1)
                {
                    return null;
                }

                SearchHit<SearchResultItem> hit = results.Hits.First();
                return hit.Document.GetItem();
            }
        }

        protected virtual ISearchIndex GetSearchIndex(string searchIndexName)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(searchIndexName, "searchIndexName");
            return ContentSearchManager.GetIndex(searchIndexName);
        }

        protected virtual Expression<Func<T, bool>> GetSearchPredicate<T>(ID bucketItemId, ID bucketFolderTemplateId) where T : SearchResultItem
        {
            var predicate = PredicateBuilder.True<T>();
            predicate = predicate.And(item => item.Paths.Contains(bucketItemId));
            predicate = predicate.And(item => item.TemplateId != bucketFolderTemplateId);
            predicate = predicate.And(item => item.Parent != bucketItemId);
            predicate = predicate.And(item => item.ItemId != bucketItemId);
            return predicate;
        }
    }
}

The class above is leveraging the Sitecore.ContentSearch API to get this bucketed Item.

Why am I using the Sitecore.ContentSearch API? Well, imagine if there are thousands if not tens of thousands of bucketed Items under the Item Bucket. A Sitecore query would be slow as molasses, and we need keep performance on our minds at all times for all of our solutions. Don’t lose sight of that on anything you build.

The GetSearchPredicate() method builds up and returns an Expression<Func> instance — let’s call this instance the “predicate”. The predicate basically says we want an Item who is a descendant of the Item Bucket; isn’t a Bucket Folder Item; lives under a Bucket Folder; and isn’t the Item Bucket Item.

The GetItem() method then uses that predicate and the Sitecore.ContentSearch API to gather those SearchResultItem instances, and then returns the Item instance on the first one in the result set if any were returned. If none were found, it returns null.

Since we have a lot of moving parts in this solution — just look at all of the classes you’ve just gone through — I need a way to piece all of this together for a GutterRenderer.

Unfortunately, we can’t magically inject instances into a GutterRenderer via the Sitecore Configuration Factory — well, you can call it but imagine all the calls I would need for this — so I decided to define the following interface whose classes would be used by a GutterRenderer, and these classes would be defined in Sitecore configuration:

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters
{
    public interface IGutter
    {
        GutterIconDescriptor GetIconDescriptor(Item item);

        bool IsVisible();
    }
}

The following class implements the interface above:

using System;

using Sitecore.Buckets.Extensions;
using Sitecore.Data.Fields;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Globalization;
using Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Determiners.Features;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers.Items;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Gutters
{
    public class FolderPathBucketGutter : IGutter
    {
        private string DefaultIcon { get; set; }

        private string DefaultToolTip { get; set; }

        private string CreatedDatetimeFieldName { get; set; }

        private IFeatureDeterminer ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer { get; set; }
        
        private IItemProvider BucketedItemProvider { get; set; }

        private IBucketFolderPathAscertainer FolderPathAscertainer { get; set; }

        public virtual GutterIconDescriptor GetIconDescriptor(Item item)
        {
            EnsureRequiredProperties();
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");

            if(!AreItemBucketsEnabled() || !item.IsABucket())
            {
                return null;
            }

            Item bucketedItem = GetBucketedItem(item);
            if(bucketedItem == null)
            {
                return CreateNewGutterIconDescriptor(DefaultIcon, DefaultToolTip);
            }

            BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters = new BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters
            {
                BucketItem = item,
                BucketedItem = bucketedItem,
                CreationDateOfNewItem = GetItemCreatedDateTime(bucketedItem)
            };

            if(!FolderPathAscertainer.IsFolderPathMatch(parameters))
            {
                return CreateNewGutterIconDescriptor(DefaultIcon, DefaultToolTip);
            }

            return CreateNewGutterIconDescriptor(FolderPathAscertainer.GetIcon(), FolderPathAscertainer.GetToolTip());
        }

        protected virtual void EnsureRequiredProperties()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(FolderPathAscertainer, "FolderPathAscertainer must be defined in configuration!");
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(DefaultIcon, "DefaultIcon must be defined in configuration!");
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(DefaultToolTip, "DefaultToolTip must be defined in configuration!");
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(CreatedDatetimeFieldName, "CreatedDatetimeFieldName must be defined in configuration!");
        }

        public virtual bool IsVisible()
        {
            return AreItemBucketsEnabled();
        }

        protected virtual bool AreItemBucketsEnabled()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer, "ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer must be set in configuration!");
            return ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer.IsEnabled();
        }

        protected virtual Item GetBucketedItem(Item bucketItem)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(BucketedItemProvider, "BucketedItemProvider must be set in configuration!");
            return BucketedItemProvider.GetItem(bucketItem);
        }

        protected virtual GutterIconDescriptor CreateNewGutterIconDescriptor(string icon, string toolTip)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(icon, "icon");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(toolTip, "toolTip");
            return new GutterIconDescriptor
            {
                Icon = icon,
                Tooltip = TranslateText(toolTip)
            };
        }

        protected virtual string TranslateText(string text)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(text, "text");
            return Translate.Text(text);
        }

        protected virtual DateTime GetItemCreatedDateTime(Item item)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(CreatedDatetimeFieldName, "CreatedDatetimeFieldName must be defined in configuration!");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            DateField created = item.Fields[CreatedDatetimeFieldName];
            if(created == null)
            {
                return DateTime.MinValue;
            }

            return created.DateTime;
        }
    }
}

The AreItemBucketsEnabled() method in the above classes determines if the Item Bucket feature is enabled via the injected IBucketFolderPathAscertainer instance. This method is then used by the IsVisible() method which represents the method by the same name on GutterRenderer instances, and is also called by the GetIconDescriptor() method.

If the Item Buckets feature is not enabled, the GetIconDescriptor() method will return null as well as when the passed Item is not an Item Bucket.

If the passed Item is an Item Bucket, the GetIconDescriptor() gets one bucketed Item via the GetBucketedItem() method — this method just delegates to the IItemProvider instance injected into the class instance — and puts this bucketed Item as well as the Item Bucket into a BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters parameters object instance. The creation date of the bucketed is also set on this parameters object since it is required when ascertaining whether the folder structure was constructed based on its creation date.

The BucketFolderPathAscertainerParameters instance is then passed to the IsFolderPathMatch() method on the injected IBucketFolderPathAscertainer property which determines if there is a folder path match.

If there is a match, a new GutterIconDescriptor instance is returned which contains the appropriate Icon and Tooltip.

If there is no match, then a new GutterIconDescriptor is returned with default values for the Icon and Tooltip.

This next class subclasses the GutterRenderer class:

using System;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Gutters
{
    public class ConfigDefinedGutterRenderer : GutterRenderer
    {
        private IGutter gutter;
        private IGutter Gutter
        {
            get
            {
                if (gutter == null)
                {
                    gutter = GetInnerGutterRenderer();
                }

                return gutter;
            }
        }

        protected override GutterIconDescriptor GetIconDescriptor(Item item)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(Gutter, "Gutter wasn't set properly. Double-check it!");
            return Gutter.GetIconDescriptor(item);
        }

        public override bool IsVisible()
        {
            Assert.IsNotNull(Gutter, "Gutter wasn't set properly. Double-check it!");
            return Gutter.IsVisible();
        }

        protected virtual IGutter GetInnerGutterRenderer()
        {
            string configPath = GetConfigPath();
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(configPath))
            {
                Log.Error("ConfigDefinedGutterRenderer: configPath must be set as a parameter!", this);
                return null;
            }

            try
            {
                IGutter gutter = Factory.CreateObject(configPath, false) as IGutter;
                if (gutter == null)
                {
                    Log.Error(string.Format("ConfigDefinedGutterRenderer: the IGutter defined in {0} isn't correctly defined. Double-check it!", configPath), this);
                    return null;
                }

                return gutter;

            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }

            return null;
        }

        protected virtual string GetConfigPath()
        {
            string key = "configPath";
            if (Parameters.ContainsKey(key))
            {
                return Parameters[key];
            }

            return string.Empty;
        }
    }
}

The GetInnerGutterRenderer() method above calls the Sitecore Configuration Factory to grab an IGutter instance from a configuration path which is set on the Parameters field of the definition Item for this GutterRenderer in the Core database — see the screenshot further down in this post — when the Gutter property is called for the first time, and sets this instance on a private member on the class instance.

Both the GetIconDescriptor() and IsVisible() methods delegate to the methods on the IGutter instance with the same names (quiz time: what design pattern is this class using? πŸ˜‰ ).

I then duct-taped everything together via the following patch configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <gutters>
      <folderPathBucketGutter type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Gutters.FolderPathBucketGutter, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
        <DefaultIcon>business/32x32/chest_add.png</DefaultIcon>
        <DefaultToolTip>This item is a bucket. You can use this as a content repository.</DefaultToolTip>
        <CreatedDatetimeFieldName>__Created</CreatedDatetimeFieldName>
        <ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer ref="determiners/features/itemBucketsFeatureDeterminer" />
        <BucketedItemProvider ref="providers/items/bucketedItemProvider" />
        <FolderPathAscertainer ref="ascertainers/buckets/compositeBucketFolderPathAscertainer" />
      </folderPathBucketGutter>
    </gutters>
    <ascertainers>
      <buckets>
        <compositeBucketFolderPathAscertainer type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers.CompositeBucketFolderPathAscertainer, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
          <ascertainers hint="raw:AddFolderPathAscertainer">
            <ascertainer ref="ascertainers/buckets/rulesDefinedBucketFolderPathAscertainer" />
            <ascertainer ref="ascertainers/buckets/dateBasedFolderPathAscertainer" />
          </ascertainers>
        </compositeBucketFolderPathAscertainer>
        <dateBasedFolderPathAscertainer type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers.DynamicBucketFolderPathPathAscertainer, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
          <Icon>Business/32x32/calendar_down.png</Icon>
          <ToolTip>This item is a bucket. Its bucket folders were generated based on the creation date of the bucketed items. You can use this as a content repository.</ToolTip>
          <PathResolver type="Sitecore.Buckets.Util.DateBasedFolderPath, Sitecore.Buckets" />
        </dateBasedFolderPathAscertainer>
        <rulesDefinedBucketFolderPathAscertainer type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Ascertainers.RulesDefinedBucketFolderPathAscertainer, Sitecore.Sandbox"
        singleInstance="true">
          <Icon>Business/32x32/briefcase_add.png</Icon>
          <ToolTip>This item is a bucket. Its bucket folders were generated by the rules engine. You can use this as a content repository.</ToolTip>
        </rulesDefinedBucketFolderPathAscertainer>
      </buckets>
    </ascertainers>
    <determiners>
      <features>
        <itemBucketsFeatureDeterminer type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Determiners.Features.ItemBucketsFeatureDeterminer" singleInstance="true" />
      </features>
    </determiners>
    <providers>
      <items>
        <bucketedItemProvider type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Providers.Items.BucketedItemProvider" singleInstance="true">
          <BucketFolderTemplateId>{ADB6CA4F-03EF-4F47-B9AC-9CE2BA53FF97}</BucketFolderTemplateId>
          <SearchIndexName>sitecore_master_index</SearchIndexName>
        </bucketedItemProvider>
      </items>
    </providers>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

We need to let Sitecore know about the new Gutter addition. I did this in the Core database:

smart-bucket-gutter-core-db

One thing to keep in mind is that the Sitecore Rules Engine folder path match will only work when we have an algorithm that will return the same path consistently for a bucketed Item. This unfortunately means I could not use the same Action from my previous post given that it generates random folder paths.

To over come this hurdle, I built the following Action which just reverses the bucketed Item’s ID (oh no, more code πŸ˜‰ ):

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Buckets.Rules.Bucketing;
using Sitecore.Buckets.Rules.Bucketing.Actions;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Buckets.Rules.Actions
{
    public class CreateReversedIDBasedPath<TContext> : CreateIDBasedPath<TContext> where TContext : BucketingRuleContext
    {
        public override void Apply(TContext ruleContext)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(ruleContext, "ruleContext");
            base.Apply(ruleContext);
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ruleContext.ResolvedPath))
            {
                return;
            }

            ruleContext.ResolvedPath = ReversePath(ruleContext.ResolvedPath);
        }

        protected virtual string ReversePath(string path)
        {
            if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(path))
            {
                return string.Empty;
            }

            List<string> pieces = path.Split('/').ToList();
            pieces.Reverse();
            return string.Join("/", pieces);
        }
    }
}

I’m not going to go into details of how I set this in the rules on /sitecore/system/Settings/Buckets/Item Buckets Settings — you can see an example of how this is done from my previous post.

Now that everything is set, we can see that the new Gutter option is available:

smart-bucket-gutter-right-click-lets-turn-on

I then turned it on:

smart-gutter-new-gutter-turned-on

As you can see, we have different Gutter icons for different folder structures.

If you have any thoughts on this, please share in a comment.

Oh, by the way, if you made it all the way to the end of this post, then you deserve a treat. Go get yourself a cookie. You deserve it. πŸ˜‰

cookie

Until next time, keep up the good fight, one piece of code at time. πŸ˜€

Abstract Out Sitecore FileWatcher Logic Which Monitors Rendering Files on the File System

While digging through code of Sitecore.IO.FileWatcher subclasses this weekend, I noticed a lot of code similarities between the LayoutWatcher and XslWatcher classes, and thought it might be a good idea to abstract this logic out into a new base abstract class so that future FileWatchers which monitor other renderings on the file system can easily be added without having to write much logic.

Before I move forward on how I did this, let me explain what the LayoutWatcher FileWatcher does. The LayoutWatcher FileWatcher clears the html cache of all websites defined in Sitecore when it determines that a layout file (a.k.a .aspx) or sublayout file (a.k.a .ascx) has been changed, deleted, renamed or added.

Likewise, the XslWatcher FileWatcher does the same thing for XSLT renderings but also clears the XSL cache along with the html cache.

Ok, now back to the abstraction. I came up with the following class to serve as the base class for any FileWatcher that will monitor renderings that live on the file system:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.IO;
using Sitecore.Web;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.IO.Watchers
{
    public abstract class RenderingFileWatcher : FileWatcher
    {
        private string RenderingFileModifiedMessage { get; set; }

        private string RenderingFileDeletedMessage { get; set; }

        private string RenderingFileRenamedMessage { get; set; }

        private string FileWatcherErrorMessage { get; set; }

        private object Owner { get; set; }

        public RenderingFileWatcher(string configPath)
            : base(configPath)
        {
            SetMessages();
        }

        private void SetMessages()
        {
            string modifiedMessage = GetRenderingFileModifiedMessage();
            AssertNotNullOrWhiteSpace(modifiedMessage, "modifiedMessage", "GetRenderingFileModifiedMessage() cannot return null, empty or whitespace!");
            RenderingFileModifiedMessage = modifiedMessage;

            string deletedMessage = GetRenderingFileDeletedMessage();
            AssertNotNullOrWhiteSpace(deletedMessage, "deletedMessage", "GetRenderingFileDeletedMessage() cannot return null, empty or whitespace!");
            RenderingFileDeletedMessage = deletedMessage;

            string renamedMessage = GetRenderingFileRenamedMessage();
            AssertNotNullOrWhiteSpace(renamedMessage, "renamedMessage", "GetRenderingFileRenamedMessage() cannot return null, empty or whitespace!");
            RenderingFileRenamedMessage = renamedMessage;

            string errorMessage = GetFileWatcherErrorMessage();
            AssertNotNullOrWhiteSpace(errorMessage, "errorMessage", "GetFileWatcherErrorMessage() cannot return null, empty or whitespace!");
            FileWatcherErrorMessage = errorMessage;

            object owner = GetOwner();
            Assert.IsNotNull(owner, "GetOwner() cannot return null!");
            Owner = owner;
        }

        protected abstract string GetRenderingFileModifiedMessage();

        protected abstract string GetRenderingFileDeletedMessage();

        protected abstract string GetRenderingFileRenamedMessage();

        protected abstract string GetFileWatcherErrorMessage();

        protected abstract object GetOwner();

        private void AssertNotNullOrWhiteSpace(string argument, string argumentName, string errorMessage)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentCondition(!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(argument), argumentName, errorMessage);
        }

        protected override void Created(string fullPath)
        {
            try
            {
                Log.Info(string.Format("{0}: {1}", RenderingFileModifiedMessage, fullPath), Owner);
                ClearCaches();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(FileWatcherErrorMessage, ex, Owner);
            }
        }

        protected override void Deleted(string filePath)
        {
            try
            {
                Log.Info(string.Format("{0}: {1}", RenderingFileDeletedMessage, filePath), Owner);
                ClearCaches();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(FileWatcherErrorMessage, ex, Owner);
            }
        }

        protected override void Renamed(string filePath, string oldFilePath)
        {
            try
            {
                Log.Info(string.Format("{0}: {1}. Old path: {2}", RenderingFileRenamedMessage, filePath, oldFilePath), Owner);
                ClearCaches();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(FileWatcherErrorMessage, ex, this);
            }
        }

        protected virtual void ClearCaches()
        {
            ClearHtmlCaches();
        }

        protected virtual void ClearHtmlCaches()
        {
            IEnumerable<SiteInfo> siteInfos = GetSiteInfos();
            if (IsNullOrEmpty(siteInfos))
            {
                return;
            }

            foreach(SiteInfo siteInfo in siteInfos)
            {
                if (siteInfo.HtmlCache != null)
                {
                    Log.Info(string.Format("Clearing Html Cache for site: {0}", siteInfo.Name), Owner);
                    siteInfo.HtmlCache.Clear();
                }
            }
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<SiteInfo> GetSiteInfos()
        {
            IEnumerable<string> siteNames = GetSiteNames();
            if (IsNullOrEmpty(siteNames))
            {
                return Enumerable.Empty<SiteInfo>();
            }

            IList<SiteInfo> siteInfos = new List<SiteInfo>();
            foreach(string siteName in siteNames)
            {
                SiteInfo siteInfo = Factory.GetSiteInfo(siteName);
                if(siteInfo != null)
                {
                    siteInfos.Add(siteInfo);
                }
            }

            return siteInfos;
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<string> GetSiteNames()
        {
            IEnumerable<string> siteNames = Factory.GetSiteNames();
            if(IsNullOrEmpty(siteNames))
            {
                return Enumerable.Empty<string>();
            }

            return siteNames;
        }

        protected virtual bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(IEnumerable<T> collection)
        {
            if (collection == null || !collection.Any())
            {
                return true;
            }

            return false;
        }
    }
}

The above class defines five abstract methods which subclasses must implement. Data returned by these methods are used when logging information or errors in the Sitecore log. The SetMessages() method vets whether subclass returned these objects correctly, and sets them in private properties which are used in the Created(), Deleted() and Renamed() methods.

The Created(), Deleted() and Renamed() methods aren’t really doing anything different from each other — they are all clearing the html cache for each Sitecore.Web.SiteInfo instance returned by the GetSiteInfos() method, though I do want to point out that each of these methods are defined on the Sitecore.IO.FileWatcher base class and serve as event handlers for file system file actions:

  • Created() is invoked when a new file is dropped in a directory or subdirectory being monitored, or when a targeted file is changed.
  • Deleted() is invoked when a targeted file is deleted.
  • Renamed() is invoked when a targeted file is renamed.

In order to ascertain whether the code above works, I need a subclass whose instance will serve as the actual FileWatcher. I decided to build the following subclass which will monitor Razor files under the /Views directory of my Sitecore website root:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.IO.Watchers
{
    public class RazorViewFileWatcher : RenderingFileWatcher
    {
        public RazorViewFileWatcher()
            : base("watchers/view")
        {
        }
        
        protected override string GetRenderingFileModifiedMessage()
        {
            return "Razor View modified";
        }

        protected override string GetRenderingFileDeletedMessage()
        {
            return "Razor View deleted";
        }

        protected override string GetRenderingFileRenamedMessage()
        {
            return "Razor View renamed";
        }

        protected override string GetFileWatcherErrorMessage()
        {
            return "Error in RazorViewFileWatcher";
        }

        protected override object GetOwner()
        {
            return this;
        }
    }
}

I’m sure Sitecore has another way of clearing/replenishing the html cache for Sitecore MVC View and Controller renderings — if you know how this works in Sitecore, please share in a comment, or better yet: please share in a blog post — but I went with this just for testing.

There’s not much going on in the above class. It’s just defining the needed methods for its base class to work its magic.

I then had to add the configuration needed by the RazorViewFileWatcher above in the following patch include configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <settings>
      <setting name="ViewsFolder" value="/Views" />
    </settings>
    <watchers>
      <view>
        <folder ref="settings/setting[@name='ViewsFolder']/@value"/>
        <filter>*.cshtml</filter>
      </view>
    </watchers>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

As I’ve discussed in this post, FileWatchers in Sitecore are Http Modules — these must be registered under <modules> of <system.webServer> of your Web.config:


<!-- lots of stuff up here -->

<system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true">

		<!-- stuff here -->
      
		<add type="Sitecore.Sandbox.IO.Watchers.RazorViewFileWatcher, Sitecore.Sandbox" name="SitecoreRazorViewFileWatcher" />

		<!-- stuff here as well -->

	</modules>

	<!-- more stuff down here -->

</system.webServer>

<!-- even more stuff down here -->

Let’s see if this works.

I decided to choose the following Razor file which comes with Web Forms For Marketers 8.1 Update-2:

razor-view-file-watcher-cshtml-1

I first performed a copy and paste of the Razor file into a new file:

razor-view-file-watcher-cshtml-2

I then deleted the new Razor file:

razor-view-file-watcher-cshtml-3

Next, I renamed the Razor file:

razor-view-file-watcher-cshtml-4

When I looked in my Sitecore log file, I saw that all operations were executed:

razor-view-file-watcher-log

If you have any thoughts on this, please drop a comment.

Upload Files via the Sitecore UploadWatcher to a Configuration Specified Media Library Folder

In my previous to last post, I discussed the Sitecore UploadWatcher — a Sitecore.IO.FileWatcher which uploads files to the Media Library when files are dropped into the /upload directory of your Sitecore website root.

Unfortunately, in the “out of the box” solution, files are uploaded directly under the Media Library root (/sitecore/media library). Imagine having to sift through all kinds of Media Library Items and folders just to find the image that you are looking for. Such would be an arduous task at best.

I decided to dig through Sitecore.Kernel.dll to see why this is the case, and discovered why: the FileCreated() method on the Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator class uses an empty Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreatorOptions instance. In order for the file to be uploaded to a specified location in the Media Library, the Destination property on the Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreatorOptions instance must be set, or it will be uploaded directly to the Media Library root.

Here’s the good news: the FileCreated() method is declared virtual, so why not subclass it and then override this method to include some custom logic to set the Destination property on the MediaCreatorOptions instance?

I did just that in the following class:

using System.IO;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.IO;
using Sitecore.Pipelines.GetMediaCreatorOptions;
using Sitecore.Resources.Media;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media
{
    public class MediaCreator : Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator
    {
        private string UploadLocation { get; set; }

        public override void FileCreated(string filePath)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(filePath, "filePath");
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(UploadLocation))
            {
                base.FileCreated(filePath);
                return;
            }

            SetContext();
            lock (FileUtil.GetFileLock(filePath))
            {
                string destination = GetMediaItemDestination(filePath);
                if (FileUtil.IsFolder(filePath))
                {
                    MediaCreatorOptions options = MediaCreatorOptions.Empty;
                    options.Destination = destination;
                    options.Build(GetMediaCreatorOptionsArgs.FileBasedContext);
                    this.CreateFromFolder(filePath, options);
                }
                else
                {
                    MediaCreatorOptions options = MediaCreatorOptions.Empty;
                    options.Destination = destination;
                    long length = new FileInfo(filePath).Length;
                    options.FileBased = (length > Settings.Media.MaxSizeInDatabase) || Settings.Media.UploadAsFiles;
                    options.Build(GetMediaCreatorOptionsArgs.FileBasedContext);
                    this.CreateFromFile(filePath, options);
                }
            }
        }

        protected virtual void SetContext()
        {
            if (Context.Site == null)
            {
                Context.SetActiveSite("shell");
            }
        }

        protected virtual string GetMediaItemDestination(string filePath)
        {
            if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(UploadLocation))
            {
                return null;
            }

            string fileNameNoExtension = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(filePath);
            string itemName = ItemUtil.ProposeValidItemName(fileNameNoExtension);
            return string.Format("{0}/{1}", UploadLocation, itemName);
        }
    }
}

The UploadLocation property in the class above is to be defined in Sitecore Configuration — see the patch include configuration file below — and then populated via the Sitecore Configuration Factory when the class is instantiated (yes, I’m defining this class in Sitecore Configuration as well).

Most of the logic in the FileCreated() method above comes from its base class Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator. I had to copy and paste most of this code from its base class’ FileCreated() method as I couldn’t just delegate to the base class’ FileCreated() method — I needed to set the Destination property on the MediaCreatorOptions instance.

The Destination property on the MediaCreatorOptions instance is being set to be the UploadLocation plus the Media Library Item name — I determine this full path in the GetMediaItemDestination() method.

Unfortunately, I also had to bring in the SetContext() method from the base class since it’s declared private — this method is needed in the FileCreated() method to ensure we have a context site defined.

Now, we need a way to set an instance of the above in the Creator property on the Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media.MediaProvider instance. Unfortunately, there was no easy way to do this without having to subclass the Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media.MediaProvider class, and then set the Creator property via its constructor:

using Sitecore.Configuration;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media
{
    public class MediaProvider : Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaProvider
    {
        private MediaCreator MediaCreator { get; set; }

        public MediaProvider()
        {
            OverrideMediaCreator();
        }

        protected virtual void OverrideMediaCreator()
        {
            Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator mediaCreator = GetMediaCreator();
            if (mediaCreator == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            Creator = mediaCreator;
        }

        protected virtual Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator GetMediaCreator()
        {
            return Factory.CreateObject("mediaLibrary/mediaCreator", false) as MediaCreator;
        }
    }
}

The OverrideMediaCreator() method above tries to get an instance of a Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator using the Sitecore Configuration Factory — it delegates to the GetMediaCreator() method to get this instance — and then set it on the Creator property of its base class if the MediaCreator obtained from the GetMediaCreator() method isn’t null.

If it is null, it just exits out — there is a default instance created in the Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaCreator base class, so that one would be used instead.

I then replaced the “out of the box” Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaProvider with the new one above, and also defined the MediaCreator above in the following patch include configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <mediaLibrary>
      <mediaProvider patch:instead="mediaProvider[@type='Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaProvider, Sitecore.Kernel']"
                     type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media.MediaProvider, Sitecore.Sandbox" />
      <mediaCreator type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media.MediaCreator, Sitecore.Sandbox">
        <UploadLocation>/sitecore/media library/uploaded</UploadLocation>
      </mediaCreator>
  </mediaLibrary>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

Let’s see how we did.

As you can see, I have an empty uploaded Media Library folder:

upload-watcher-not-uploaded-to-folder

Let’s move an image into the /upload folder of my Sitecore instance:

upload-watcher-upload-to-folder

After reloading the “uploaded” Media Library folder, I see that the image was uploaded to it:

upload-watcher-uploaded-to-folder

I would also to like to mention that this solution will also work if there is no uploaded folder in the Media Library — it will be created during upload process.

If you have any thoughts on this, please share in a comment.

Augment the Sitecore UploadWatcher to Delete Files from the Upload Directory After Uploading to the Media Library

In my previous post I discussed the Sitecore UploadWatcher — a Sitecore.IO.FileWatcher which monitors the /upload directory of your Sitecore instance and uploads files dropped into that directory into the Media Library.

One thing I could never find in the UploadWatcher is functionality to delete files in the /upload directory after they are uploaded into the Media Library — if you know of an “out of the box” way of doing this, please drop a comment.

After peeking into Sitecore.Resources.Media.UploadWatcher using .NET Reflector, I discovered I could add this functionality quite easily since its Created() method — this method handles the uploading of the files into the Media Library by delegating to Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaManager.Creator.FileCreated() — is overridable. In theory, all I would need to do would be to subclass the UploadWatcher class; override the Created() method; delegate to the base class’ Created() method to handle the upload of the file to the Media Library; then delete the file once the base class’ Create() method was done executing.

After coding, experimenting and refactoring, I built the following class that subclasses Sitecore.Resources.Media.UploadWatcher:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Xml;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.IO;
using Sitecore.Resources.Media;
using Sitecore.Xml;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media
{
    public class CleanupUploadWatcher : UploadWatcher
    {
        private IEnumerable<string> PathsToIgnore { get; set; }

        private IEnumerable<string> FileNamePartsToIgnore { get; set; }

        private bool ShouldDeleteAfterUpload { get; set; }

        public CleanupUploadWatcher()
            : base()
        {
            Initialize();
        }

        private void Initialize()
        {
            IEnumerable<XmlNode> configNodes = GetIgnoreConfigNodes();
            PathsToIgnore = GetPathsToIgnore(configNodes);
            FileNamePartsToIgnore = GetFileNamePartsToIgnore(configNodes);
            ShouldDeleteAfterUpload = GetShouldDeleteAfterUpload();
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<XmlNode> GetIgnoreConfigNodes()
        {
            string configNodeRoot = GetConfigNodeRoot();
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(configNodeRoot))
            {
                return Enumerable.Empty<XmlNode>();
            }

            XmlNode rootNode = Factory.GetConfigNode(configNodeRoot);
            if (rootNode == null)
            {
                return Enumerable.Empty<XmlNode>();
            }

            return XmlUtil.GetChildNodes(rootNode, true);
        }

        protected virtual string GetConfigNodeRoot()
        {
            return "mediaLibrary/watcher/ignoreList";
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<string> GetPathsToIgnore(IEnumerable<XmlNode> nodes)
        {
            if (IsEmpty(nodes))
            {
                return Enumerable.Empty<string>();
            }

            HashSet<string> pathsToIgnore = new HashSet<string>();
            foreach (XmlNode node in nodes)
            {
                string containsValue = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("contains", node);
                if (ShouldAddContainsValue(containsValue, node, "ignorepath"))
                {
                    pathsToIgnore.Add(containsValue);
                }
            }

            return pathsToIgnore;
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<string> GetFileNamePartsToIgnore(IEnumerable<XmlNode> nodes)
        {
            if (IsEmpty(nodes))
            {
                return Enumerable.Empty<string>();
            }

            HashSet<string> partsToIgnore = new HashSet<string>();
            foreach (XmlNode node in nodes)
            {
                string containsValue = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("contains", node);
                if (ShouldAddContainsValue(containsValue, node, "ignore"))
                {
                    partsToIgnore.Add(containsValue);
                }
            }

            return partsToIgnore;
        }

        protected virtual bool ShouldAddContainsValue(string containsValue, XmlNode node, string targetNodeName)
        {
            return !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(containsValue)
                    && node != null
                    && string.Equals(node.Name, targetNodeName, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
        }

        protected static bool IsEmpty<T>(IEnumerable<T> collection)
        {
            return collection == null || !collection.Any();
        }

        protected override void Created(string filePath)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(filePath, "filePath");
            if (!ShouldIgnoreFile(filePath))
            {
                base.Created(filePath);
                DeleteFile(filePath);
            }
        }

        protected virtual bool GetShouldDeleteAfterUpload()
        {
            XmlNode node = Factory.GetConfigNode("watchers/media/additionalSettings");
            if (node == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            string deleteAfterUploadValue = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("deleteAfterUpload", node);
            if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(deleteAfterUploadValue))
            {
                return false;
            }
            
            bool shouldDelete;
            bool.TryParse(deleteAfterUploadValue, out shouldDelete);
            return shouldDelete;
        }

        protected virtual bool ShouldIgnoreFile(string filePath)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(filePath, "filePath");
            foreach (string path in PathsToIgnore)
            {
                if (ContainsSubstring(filePath, path))
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }

            string fileName = Path.GetFileName(filePath);
            foreach (string part in FileNamePartsToIgnore)
            {
                if(ContainsSubstring(fileName, part))
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }

            return false;
        }

        protected virtual bool ContainsSubstring(string value, string substring)
        {
            if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value) || string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(substring))
            {
                return false;
            }

            return value.IndexOf(substring, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) > -1;
        }

        protected virtual void DeleteFile(string filePath)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(filePath, "filePath");
            if(!ShouldDeleteAfterUpload)
            {
                return;
            }

            try
            {
                FileUtil.Delete(filePath);
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }
        }
    }
}

You might thinking “Mike, there is more going on in here than just delegating to the base class’ Created() method and deleting the file. Well, you are correct — I had to do a few things further than what I thought I needed to do, and I’ll explain why.

I had to duplicate the logic — actually I wrote my own logic — to parse the Sitecore configuration which defines the substrings of file names and paths to ignore since these collections on the base UploadWatcher class are private — subclasses cannot access these collections — in order to prevent the code from deleting a file that should be ignored.

I also wedged in configuration with code to turn off the delete functionality if needed.

I then created the following patch include configuration file to hold the configuration setting to turn the delete functionality on/off:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <watchers>
      <media>
        <additionalSettings deleteAfterUpload="true" />
      </media>
    </watchers>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

I then registered the new CleanupUploadWatcher in the Web.config — please see my previous post which explains why this is needed:

<system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true">

      <!-- stuff here -->

      <!-- <add type="Sitecore.Resources.Media.UploadWatcher, Sitecore.Kernel" name="SitecoreUploadWatcher" /> -->
      <add type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Resources.Media.CleanupUploadWatcher, Sitecore.Sandbox" name="SitecoreUploadWatcher" />

      <!-- more stuff down here -->

    </modules>

    <!-- and more stuff down here -->
    
<system.webServer>

Let’s see this in action!

As you can see, there is no Media Library Item in the root of my Media Library (/sitecore/media library) — this is where the UploadWatcher uploads the file to:

cleanup-uploadwatcher-media-library-no-file

I then copied an image from a folder on my Desktop to the /upload directory of my Sitecore instance:

cleanup-uploadwatcher-move-file

As you can see above, the image is deleted after it is dropped.

I then went back to my Media Library and refreshed. As you can see here, the file was uploaded:

cleanup-uploadwatcher-media-library-file

If you have any thoughts on this or suggestions on making it better, please share in a comment.

Download Random Giphy Images and Save to the Media Library Via a Custom Content Editor Image Field in Sitecore

In my previous post I created a custom Content Editor image field in the Sitecore Experience Platform. This custom image field gives content authors the ability to download an image from outside of their Sitecore instance; save the image to the Media Library; and then map that resulting Media Library Item to the custom Image field on an Item in the content tree.

Building that solution was a great way to spend a Friday night (and even the following Saturday morning) — though I bet some people would argue watching cat videos on YouTube might be better way to spend a Friday night — and even gave me the opportunity to share that solution with you guys.

After sharing this post on Twitter, Sitecore MVP Kam Figy replied to that tweet with the following:

This gave me an idea: why not modify the solution from my previous post to give the ability to download a random image from Giphy via their the API?

You might be asking yourself “what is this Giphy thing?” Giphy is basically a site that allows users to upload images — more specifically animated GIFs — and then associate those uploaded images with tags. These tags are used for finding images on their site and also through their API.

You might be now asking “what’s the point of Giphy?” The point is to have fun and share a laugh; animated GIFs can be a great way of achieving these.

Some smart folks out there have built integrations into other software platforms which give users the ability pull images from the Giphy API. An example of this can be seen in Slack messaging application.

As a side note, if you aren’t on the Sitecore Community Slack, you probably should be. This is the fastest way to get help, share ideas and even have some good laughs from close to 1000 Sitecore developers, architects and marketers from around the world in real-time. If you would like to join the Sitecore Community Slack, please let me know and I will send you an invite though please don’t ask for an invite in comments section below on this post. Instead reach out to me on Twitter: @mike_i_reynolds. You can also reach out to Sitecore MVP Akshay Sura: @akshaysura13.

Here’s an example of me calling up an image using some tags in one of the channels on the Sitecore Community Slack using the Giphy integration for Slack:

giphy-image-slack

There really isn’t anything magical about the Giphy API — all you have to do is send an HTTP request with some query string parameters. Giphy’s API will then give you a response in JSON:

giphy-image-json

Before I dig into the solution below, I do want to let you know I will not be talking about all of the code in the solution. Most of the code was repurposed from my previous post. If you have not read my previous post, please read it before moving forward so you have a full understanding of how this works.

Moreover, do note there is probably no business value in using the following solution as is — it was built for fun on another Friday night and Saturday morning. πŸ˜‰

To get data out of this JSON response, I decided to use Newtonsoft.Json. Why did I choose this? It was an easy decision: Newtonsoft.Json comes with Sitecore “out of the box” so it was convenient for me to choose this as a way to parse the JSON coming from the Giphy API.

I created the following model classes with JSON to C# property mappings:

using Newtonsoft.Json;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers
{
    public class GiphyData
    {
        [JsonProperty("type")]
        public string Type { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("id")]
        public string Id { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("url")]
        public string Url { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("image_original_url")]
        public string ImageOriginalUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("image_url")]
        public string ImageUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("image_mp4_url")]
        public string ImageMp4Url { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("image_frames")]
        public string ImageFrames { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("image_width")]
        public string ImageWidth { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("image_height")]
        public string ImageHeight { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_downsampled_url")]
        public string FixedHeightDownsampledUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_downsampled_width")]
        public string FixedHeightDownsampledWidth { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_downsampled_height")]
        public string FixedHeightDownsampledHeight { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_downsampled_url")]
        public string FixedWidthDownsampledUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_downsampled_width")]
        public string FixedWidthDownsampledWidth { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_downsampled_height")]
        public string FixedWidthDownsampledHeight { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_small_url")]
        public string FixedHeightSmallUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_small_still_url")]
        public string FixedHeightSmallStillUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_small_width")]
        public string FixedHeightSmallWidth { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_height_small_height")]
        public string FixedHeightSmallHeight { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_small_url")]
        public string FixedWidthSmallUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_small_still_url")]
        public string FixedWidthSmallStillUrl { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_small_width")]
        public string FixedWidthSmallWidth { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("fixed_width_small_height")]
        public string FixedWidthSmallHeight { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("username")]
        public string Username { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("caption")]
        public string Caption { get; set; }
    }
}
using Newtonsoft.Json;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers
{
    public class GiphyMeta
    {
        [JsonProperty("status")]
        public int Status { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("msg")]
        public string Message { get; set; }
    }
}
using Newtonsoft.Json;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers
{
    public class GiphyResponse
    {
        [JsonProperty("data")]
        public GiphyData Data { get; set; }

        [JsonProperty("meta")]
        public GiphyMeta Meta { get; set; }
    }
}

Every property above in every class represents a JSON property/object in the response coming back from the Giphy API.

Now, we need a way to make a request to the Giphy API. I built the following interface whose instances will do just that:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers
{
    public interface IGiphyImageProvider
    {
        GiphyData GetRandomGigphyImageData(string tags);
    }
}

The following class implements the interface above:

using System;
using System.Net;

using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System.IO;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers
{
    public class GiphyImageProvider : IGiphyImageProvider
    {
        private string RequestUrlFormat { get; set; }

        private string ApiKey { get; set; }

        public GiphyData GetRandomGigphyImageData(string tags)
        {
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(RequestUrlFormat, "RequestUrlFormat");
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(ApiKey, "ApiKey");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(tags, "tags");
            string response = GetJsonResponse(GetRequestUrl(tags));
            if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(response))
            {
                return new GiphyData();
            }

            try
            {
                GiphyResponse giphyResponse = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<GiphyResponse>(response);
                if(giphyResponse != null && giphyResponse.Meta != null && giphyResponse.Meta.Status == 200 && giphyResponse.Data != null)
                {
                    return giphyResponse.Data;
                }
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }

            return new GiphyData();
        }

        protected virtual string GetRequestUrl(string tags)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(tags, "tags");
            return string.Format(RequestUrlFormat, ApiKey, Uri.EscapeDataString(tags));
        }

        protected virtual string GetJsonResponse(string requestUrl)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(requestUrl, "requestUrl");
            try
            {
                WebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.Create(requestUrl);
                request.Method = "GET";
                string json;
                using (WebResponse response = request.GetResponse())
                {
                    using (Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream())
                    {
                        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(responseStream))
                        {
                            return sr.ReadToEnd();
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(ToString(), ex, this);
            }

            return string.Empty;
        }
    }
}

Code in the methods above basically take in tags for the type of random image we want from Giphy; build up the request URL — the template of the request URL and API key (I’m using the public key which is open for developers to experiment with) are populated via the Sitecore Configuration Factory (have a look at the patch include configuration file further down in this post to get an idea of how the properties of this class are populated); make the request to the Giphy API; get back the response; hand the response over to some Newtonsoft.Json API code to parse JSON into model instances of the classes shown further above in this post; and then return the nested model instances.

I then created the following Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Image subclass which represents the custom Content Editor Image field:

using System;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Pipelines;
using Sitecore.Shell.Framework;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.DownloadImageToMediaLibrary;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor
{
    public class GiphyImage : Sitecore.Shell.Applications.ContentEditor.Image
    {
        private IGiphyImageProvider GiphyImageProvider { get; set; }

        public GiphyImage()
            : base()
        {
            GiphyImageProvider = GetGiphyImageProvider();
        }

        protected virtual IGiphyImageProvider GetGiphyImageProvider()
        {
            IGiphyImageProvider giphyImageProvider = Factory.CreateObject("imageProviders/giphyImageProvider", false) as IGiphyImageProvider;
            Assert.IsNotNull(giphyImageProvider, "The giphyImageProvider was not properly defined in configuration");
            return giphyImageProvider;
        }

        public override void HandleMessage(Message message)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(message, "message");
            if (string.Equals(message.Name, "contentimage:downloadGiphy", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
            {
                GetInputFromUser();
                return;
            }

            base.HandleMessage(message);
        }

        protected void GetInputFromUser()
        {
            RunProcessor("GetGiphyTags", new ClientPipelineArgs());
        }

        protected virtual void GetGiphyTags(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            if (!args.IsPostBack)
            {
                SheerResponse.Input("Enter giphy tags:", string.Empty);
                args.WaitForPostBack();
            }
            else if (args.HasResult)
            {
                args.Parameters["tags"] = args.Result;
                args.IsPostBack = false;
                RunProcessor("GetGiphyImageUrl", args);
            }
            else
            {
                CancelOperation(args);
            }
        }

        protected virtual void GetGiphyImageUrl(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            GiphyData giphyData = GiphyImageProvider.GetRandomGigphyImageData(args.Parameters["tags"]);
            if (giphyData == null || string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(giphyData.ImageUrl))
            {
                SheerResponse.Alert("Unfortunately, no image matched the tags you specified. Please try again.");
                CancelOperation(args);
                return;
            }

            args.Parameters["imageUrl"] = giphyData.ImageUrl;
            args.IsPostBack = false;
            RunProcessor("ChooseMediaLibraryFolder", args);
        }

        protected virtual void RunProcessor(string processor, ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(processor, "processor");
            Sitecore.Context.ClientPage.Start(this, processor, args);
        }

        public void ChooseMediaLibraryFolder(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            if (!args.IsPostBack)
            {
                Dialogs.BrowseItem
                (
                    "Select A Media Library Folder",
                    "Please select a media library folder to store the Giphy image.",
                    "Applications/32x32/folder_into.png",
                    "OK",
                    "/sitecore/media library", 
                    string.Empty
                );

                args.WaitForPostBack();
            }
            else if (args.HasResult)
            {
                Item folder = Client.ContentDatabase.Items[args.Result];
                args.Parameters["mediaLibaryFolderPath"] = folder.Paths.FullPath;
                args.IsPostBack = false;
                RunProcessor("DownloadImage", args);
            }
            else
            {
                CancelOperation(args);
            }
        }

        protected virtual void DownloadImage(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            DownloadImageToMediaLibraryArgs downloadArgs = new DownloadImageToMediaLibraryArgs
            {
                Database = Client.ContentDatabase,
                ImageUrl = args.Parameters["imageUrl"],
                MediaLibaryFolderPath = args.Parameters["mediaLibaryFolderPath"]
            };

            CorePipeline.Run("downloadImageToMediaLibrary", downloadArgs);
            SetMediaItemInField(downloadArgs);
        }

        protected virtual void SetMediaItemInField(DownloadImageToMediaLibraryArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            if(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(args.MediaId) || string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(args.MediaPath))
            {
                return;
            }

            XmlValue.SetAttribute("mediaid", args.MediaId);
            Value = args.MediaPath;
            Update();
            SetModified();
        }

        protected virtual void CancelOperation(ClientPipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            args.AbortPipeline();
        }
    }
}

The class above does not differ much from the Image class I shared in my previous post. The only differences are in the instantiation of an IGiphyImageProvider object using the Sitecore Configuration Factory — this object is used for getting the Giphy image URL from the Giphy API; the GetGiphyTags() method prompts the user for tags used in calling up a random image from Giphy; and in the GetGiphyImageUrl() method which uses the IGiphyImageProvider instance to get the image URL. The rest of the code in this class is unmodified from the Image class shared in my previous post.

I then defined the IGiphyImageProvider code in the following patch include configuration file:

<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <imageProviders>
      <giphyImageProvider type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Providers.GiphyImageProvider, Sitecore.Sandbox" singleInstance="true">
        <RequestUrlFormat>http://api.giphy.com/v1/gifs/random?api_key={0}&amp;tag={1}</RequestUrlFormat>
        <ApiKey>dc6zaTOxFJmzC</ApiKey>
      </giphyImageProvider>
    </imageProviders>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

Be sure to check out the patch include configuration file from my previous post as it contains the custom pipeline that downloads images from a URL.

You should also refer my previous post which shows you how to register a custom Content Editor field in the core database of Sitecore.

Let’s test this out.

We need to add this new field to a template. I’ve added it to the “out of the box” Sample Item template:
giphy-image-sample-item-new-field

My Home item uses the above template. Let’s download a random Giphy image on it:

giphy-image-home-1

I then supplied some tags for getting a random image:

giphy-image-home-2

Let’s choose a place to save the image in the Media Library:

giphy-image-home-3

As you can see, the image was downloaded and saved into the Media Library in the selected folder, and then saved in the custom field on the Home item:

giphy-image-home-4

If you are curious, this is the image that was returned by the Giphy API:

giphy-image-downloaded

If you have any thoughts on this, please share in a comment.