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Monthly Archives: December 2013

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Delete All But This: Delete Sibling Items Using a Custom Item Context Menu Option in Sitecore

Every so often I find myself having to delete all Sitecore items in a folder except for one — the reason for this eludes me at the moment, but it does make an appearance once in a while (if this also happens to you, and you remember the context for why it happens, please share in a comment) — and it feels like it takes ages to delete all of these items: I have to step through all of these items in the Sitecore content tree, and delete each individually .

When this happens I usually say to myself “wouldn’t it be cool to have something like the ‘Close All But This’ feature found in Visual Studio?”:

close-all-but-this-vs

I always forget to write this idea down, but did remember it a couple of days ago, and decided to build something to save time when deleting all items in a folder except for one.

To delete all items in a folder, we need a way to get all sibling items, and exclude the item we don’t want to delete. I decided to create a custom pipeline to do this, and defined the following parameter object for it:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Pipelines;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.GetSiblings
{
    public class GetSiblingsArgs : PipelineArgs
    {
        public Item Item { get; set; }

        public IEnumerable<Item> Siblings { get; set; } 
    }
}

Now that we have the parameter object defined, we need a class with methods that will compose our custom pipeline for grabbing sibling items in Sitecore. The following class does the trick:

using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.GetSiblings
{
    public class GetSiblingsOperations
    {
        public void EnsureItem(GetSiblingsArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            if (args.Item == null)
            {
                args.AbortPipeline();
            }
        }

        public void GetSiblings(GetSiblingsArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Item, "args.Item");
            args.Siblings = (from sibling in args.Item.Parent.GetChildren()
                             where sibling.ID != args.Item.ID
                             select sibling).ToList();
        }
    }
}

The EnsureItem() method above just makes sure the item instance passed to it isn’t null, and aborts the pipeline if it is.

The GetSiblings() method gets all siblings items of the item — it just grabs all children of its parent, and excludes the item in question from the resulting collection using LINQ.

Now that we have a way to get sibling items, we need a way to delete them. I decided to build another custom pipeline to get sibling items for an item — by leveraging the pipeline created above — and delete them, and created the following parameter object for it:

using System.Collections.Generic;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.DeleteSiblings
{
    public class DeleteSiblingsArgs : ClientPipelineArgs
    {
        public Item Item { get; set; }

        public bool ShouldDelete { get; set; }

        public IEnumerable<Item> Siblings { get; set; } 
    }
}

The following class contains methods that will be used it our custom client pipeline to delete sibling items:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Pipelines;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.GetSiblings;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.DeleteSiblings
{
    public class DeleteSiblingsOperations
    {
        private string DeleteConfirmationMessage { get; set; }
        private string DeleteConfirmationWindowWidth { get; set; }
        private string DeleteConfirmationWindowHeight { get; set; }

        public void ConfirmDeleteAction(DeleteSiblingsArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(DeleteConfirmationMessage, "DeleteConfirmationMessage");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(DeleteConfirmationWindowWidth, "DeleteConfirmationWindowWidth");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(DeleteConfirmationWindowHeight, "DeleteConfirmationWindowHeight");
            if (!args.IsPostBack)
            {
                SheerResponse.YesNoCancel(DeleteConfirmationMessage, DeleteConfirmationWindowWidth, DeleteConfirmationWindowHeight);
                args.WaitForPostBack();
            }
            else if (args.HasResult)
            {
                args.ShouldDelete = AreEqualIgnoreCase(args.Result, "yes");
                args.IsPostBack = false;
            }
        }

        public void GetSiblingsIfConfirmed(DeleteSiblingsArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            if (!args.ShouldDelete)
            {
                args.AbortPipeline();
                return;
            }
            
            args.Siblings = GetSiblings(args.Item);
        }

        protected virtual IEnumerable<Item> GetSiblings(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            GetSiblingsArgs getSiblingsArgs = new GetSiblingsArgs { Item = item };
            CorePipeline.Run("getSiblings", getSiblingsArgs);
            return getSiblingsArgs.Siblings;
        }

        public void DeleteSiblings(DeleteSiblingsArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args.Siblings, "args.Siblings");
            DeleteItems(args.Siblings);
        }

        protected virtual void DeleteItems(IEnumerable<Item> items)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(items, "items");
            foreach (Item item in items)
            {
                item.Recycle();
            }
        }

        private static bool AreEqualIgnoreCase(string one, string two)
        {
            return string.Equals(one, two, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
        }
    }
}

The ConfirmDeleteAction() method — which is invoked first in the custom client pipeline — asks the user if he/she would like to delete all sibling items for the item in question.

The GetSiblingsIfConfirmed() method is then processed next in the pipeline sequence, and ascertains whether the user had clicked the ‘Yes’ button — this is a button in the YesNoCancel dialog that was presented to the user via the ConfirmDeleteAction() method.

If the user had clicked the ‘Yes’ button, sibling items are grabbed from Sitecore — this is done using the custom pipeline built above — and is set on Siblings property of the DeleteSiblingsArgs instance.

The DeleteSiblings() method is then processed next, and basically does as named: it deletes all items in the Siblings property of the DeleteSiblingsArgs instance.

Now that we are armed with our pipelines above, we need a way to call them from the Sitecore UI. The following command was built for that purpose:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Pipelines;
using Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.GetSiblings;
using Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.DeleteSiblings;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Commands
{
    public class DeleteAllButThis : Command
    {
        public override void Execute(CommandContext context)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(context, "context");
            DeleteSiblings(context);
        }

        private static void DeleteSiblings(CommandContext context)
        {
            Context.ClientPage.Start("uiDeleteSiblings", new DeleteSiblingsArgs { Item = GetItem(context) });
        }

        public override CommandState QueryState(CommandContext context)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(context, "context");
            if (!HasSiblings(GetItem(context)))
            {
                return CommandState.Hidden;
            }

            return CommandState.Enabled;
        }

        private static bool HasSiblings(Item item)
        {
            return GetSiblings(item).Any();
        }

        private static IEnumerable<Item> GetSiblings(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            GetSiblingsArgs getSiblingsArgs = new GetSiblingsArgs { Item = item };
            CorePipeline.Run("getSiblings", getSiblingsArgs);
            return getSiblingsArgs.Siblings;
        }

        private static Item GetItem(CommandContext context)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(context, "context");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(context.Items, "context.Items");
            return context.Items.FirstOrDefault();
        }
    }
}

The command above will only display if the context item has siblings — we invoke the pipeline defined towards the beginning of this post to get sibling items. If none are returned, the command is hidden.

When the command executes, we basically just pass the context item to our custom pipeline that deletes sibling items, and sit back and wait for them to be deleted (I just lean back, and put my feet up on my desk).

I then strung everything together using the following configuration include file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <commands>
      <command name="item:DeleteAllButThis" type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Commands.DeleteAllButThis, Sitecore.Sandbox"/>
    </commands>
    <pipelines>
      <getSiblings>
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.GetSiblings.GetSiblingsOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="EnsureItem" />
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.GetSiblings.GetSiblingsOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="GetSiblings" />
      </getSiblings>
    </pipelines>
    <processors>
      <uiDeleteSiblings>
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.DeleteSiblings.DeleteSiblingsOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="ConfirmDeleteAction">
          <DeleteConfirmationMessage>Are you sure you want to delete all sibling items and their descendants?</DeleteConfirmationMessage>
          <DeleteConfirmationWindowWidth>200</DeleteConfirmationWindowWidth>
          <DeleteConfirmationWindowHeight>200</DeleteConfirmationWindowHeight>
        </processor>
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.DeleteSiblings.DeleteSiblingsOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="GetSiblingsIfConfirmed"/>
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Shell.Framework.Pipelines.DeleteSiblings.DeleteSiblingsOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox" method="DeleteSiblings"/>
	    </uiDeleteSiblings>
    </processors>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

I also had to wire the command above to the Sitecore UI by defining a context menu item in the core database. I’ve omitted how I’ve done this. If you would like to learn how to do this, check out my first and second posts on adding to the item context menu.

Let’s see this in action.

I first created some items to delete, and one item that I don’t want to delete:

stuff-to-delete

I then right-clicked on the item I don’t want to delete, and was presented with the new item context menu option:

delete-all-but-this-context-menu

I was then prompted with a confirmation dialog:

delete-all-but-this-confirmation-dialog

I clicked ‘Yes’, and then saw that all sibling items were deleted:

items-deleted

If you have any suggestions on making this better, please drop a comment.

Until next time, have a Sitecoretastic day!

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Restart the Sitecore Client and Server Using Custom Pipelines

Last week Michael West asked me about creating shortcuts to restart the Sitecore client and server via this tweet, and I was immediately curious myself on what was needed to accomplish this.

If you are unfamiliar with restarting the Sitecore client and server, these are options that are presented to Sitecore users — typically developers — after installing a package into Sitecore:

install-package-end-wizard

Until last week, I never understood how either of these checkboxes worked, and uncovered the following code during my research:

restart-code-in-InstallPackageForm

Michael West had conveyed how he wished these two lines of code lived in pipelines, and that prompted me to write this article — basically encapsulate the logic above into two custom pipelines: one to restart the Sitecore client, and the other to restart the Sitecore server.

I decided to define the concept of a ‘Restarter’, an object that restarts something — this could be anything — and defined the following interface for such objects:

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Restarters
{
    public interface IRestarter
    {
        void Restart();
    }
}

I then created the following IRestarter for the Sitecore client:

using Sitecore;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Restarters
{
    public class SitecoreClientRestarter : IRestarter
    {
        private ClientResponse ClientResponse { get; set; }

        public SitecoreClientRestarter()
            : this(Context.ClientPage)
        {
        }

        public SitecoreClientRestarter(ClientPage clientPage)
        {
            SetClientResponse(clientPage);
        }

        public SitecoreClientRestarter(ClientResponse clientResponse)
        {
            SetClientResponse(clientResponse);
        }

        private void SetClientResponse(ClientPage clientPage)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(clientPage, "clientPage");
            SetClientResponse(clientPage.ClientResponse);
        }

        private void SetClientResponse(ClientResponse clientResponse)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(clientResponse, "clientResponse");
            ClientResponse = clientResponse;
        }

        public void Restart()
        {
            ClientResponse.Broadcast(ClientResponse.SetLocation(string.Empty), "Shell");
        }
    }
}

The class above has three constructors. One constructor takes an instance of Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer.ClientResponse — this lives in Sitecore.Kernel.dll — and another constructor takes in an instance of
Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer.ClientPage — this also lives in Sitecore.Kernel.dll — which contains a property instance of Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer.ClientResponse, and this instance is set on the ClientResponse property of the SitecoreClientRestarter class.

The third constructor — which is parameterless — calls the constructor that takes in a Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer.ClientPage instance, and passes the ClientResponse instance set in Sitecore.Context.

I followed building the above class with another IRestarter — one that restarts the Sitecore server:

using Sitecore.Install;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Restarters
{
    public class SitecoreServerRestarter : IRestarter
    {
        public SitecoreServerRestarter()
        {
        }

        public void Restart()
        {
            Installer.RestartServer();
        }
    }
}

There really isn’t much happening in the class above. It just calls the static method RestartServer() — this method changes the timestamp on the Sitecore instance’s Web.config to trigger a web application restart — on Sitecore.Install.Installer in Sitecore.Kernel.dll.

Now we need to a way to use the IRestarter classes above. I built the following class to serve as a processor of custom pipelines I define later on in this post:

using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Pipelines;

using Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Restarters;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.RestartRestarter
{
    public class RestartRestarterOperations
    {
        private IRestarter Restarter { get; set; }

        public void Process(PipelineArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(Restarter, "Restarter");
            Restarter.Restart();
        }
    }
}

Through a pipeline processor configuration setting, we define the type of IRestarter — it’s magically created by Sitecore when the pipeline processor instance is created.

After some null checks, the Process() method invokes Restart() on the IRestarter instance, ultimately restarting whatever the IRestarter is set to restart.

I then needed a way to test the pipelines I define later on in this post. I built the following class to serve as commands that I added into the Sitecore ribbon:

using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Pipelines;
using Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Commands.Admin
{
    public class Restart : Command
    {
        public override void Execute(CommandContext context)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(context, "context");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(context.Parameters, "context.Parameters");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(context.Parameters["pipeline"], "context.Parameters[\"pipeline\"]");
            CorePipeline.Run(context.Parameters["pipeline"], new PipelineArgs());
        }
    }
}

The command above expects a pipeline name to be supplied via the Parameters NameValueCollection instance set on the CommandContext instance passed to the Execute method() — I show later on in this post how I pass the name of the pipeline to the command.

If the pipeline name is given, we invoke the pipeline.

I then glued everything together using the following configuration file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <commands>
      <command name="admin:Restart" type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Commands.Admin.Restart, Sitecore.Sandbox"/>
    </commands>
    <pipelines>
      <restartClient>
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.RestartRestarter.RestartRestarterOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox">
          <Restarter type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Restarters.SitecoreClientRestarter, Sitecore.Sandbox"/>
        </processor>  
      </restartClient>
      <restartServer>
        <processor type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.RestartRestarter.RestartRestarterOperations, Sitecore.Sandbox">
          <Restarter type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Utilities.Restarters.SitecoreServerRestarter, Sitecore.Sandbox"/>
        </processor>
      </restartServer>
    </pipelines>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

I’m omitting how I created custom buttons in a custom ribbon in Sitecore to test this. If you want to learn about adding buttons to the Sitecore Ribbon, please read John West’s blog post on doing so.

However, I did do the following to pass the name of the pipeline we want to invoke in the custom command class defined above:

restart-client-button

I wish I could show you some screenshots on how this works. However, there really isn’t much visual to see here.

If you have any suggestions on how I could show this in action, or improve the code above, please share in a comment.