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Add ‘Has Content In Language’ Property to Sitecore Item Web API Responses

The other day I had read a forum thread on SDN where the poster had asked whether one could determine if content returned from the Sitecore Item Web API for an Item was the actual content for the Item in the requested language.

I was intrigued by this question because I would have assumed that no results would be returned for the Item when it does not have content in the requested language but that is not the case: I had replicated what the poster had seen.

As a workaround, I built the following class to serve as an <itemWebApiGetProperties> pipeline processor which sets a property in the response indicating whether the Item has content in the requested language (check out my previous post on adding additional properties to Sitecore Item Web API responses for more information on this topic):

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Globalization;
using Sitecore.ItemWebApi.Pipelines.GetProperties;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.ItemWebApi.Pipelines.GetProperties
{
    public class SetHasContentInLanguageProperty : GetPropertiesProcessor
    {
        public override void Process(GetPropertiesArgs arguments)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(arguments, "arguments");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(arguments.Item, "arguments.Item");
            arguments.Properties.Add("HasContentInLanguage", IsLanguageInCollection(arguments.Item.Languages, arguments.Item.Language));
        }

        private static bool IsLanguageInCollection(IEnumerable<Language> languages, Language language)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(languages, "languages");
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(language, "language");
            return languages.Any(lang => lang == language);
        }
    }
}

The code in the above class checks to see if the Item has content in the requested language — the latter is set in the Language property of the Item instance, and the Languages property contains a list of all languages it has content for.

I then added the above pipeline processor via the following configuration file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <pipelines>
      <itemWebApiGetProperties>
        <processor patch:after="processor[@type='Sitecore.ItemWebApi.Pipelines.GetProperties.GetProperties, Sitecore.ItemWebApi']"
            type="Sitecore.Sandbox.ItemWebApi.Pipelines.GetProperties.SetHasContentInLanguageProperty, Sitecore.Sandbox" />
      </itemWebApiGetProperties>
    </pipelines>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

Let’s see how this works!

I first created an Item for testing:

content-in-language-test

This Item only has content in English:

content-in-language-test-en

I then toggled my Sitecore Item Web API configuration to allow for anonymous access so that I can make requests in my browser, and made a request for the test Item in English:

english-has-content

The Item does have content in English, and this is denoted by the ‘HasContentInLanguage’ property.

I then made a request for the Item in French:

french-does-not-have-content

As expected, the ‘HasContentInLanguage’ is false since the Item does not have content in French.

If you have any questions or thoughts on this, please drop a comment.

Specify Which Sitecore Web Forms for Marketers Form To Render Via the Query String

Today I saw a post in one of the SDN forums asking how one could go about building a page in Sitecore that can render a Web Forms for Marketers (WFFM) form based on an ID passed via the query string.

I built the following WFFM FormRenderer as a “proof of concept” to accomplish this — this solution assumes the ID we are passing is the ID of the form, and not some other ID (or guid):

using System;
using System.Web;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Form.Core.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Form.Core.Renderings;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Form.Core.Renderings
{
    public class DetectIDFormRenderer : FormRender
    {
        protected override void OnInit(System.EventArgs e)
        {
            string detectedFormId = GetDetectedFormId();
            if (IsValidFormId(detectedFormId))
            {
                FormID = detectedFormId;
            }
            
            base.OnInit(e);
        }

        private static string GetDetectedFormId()
        {
            return HttpContext.Current.Request["formId"];
        }

        private static bool IsValidFormId(string id)
        {
            return !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(id) 
                    && IsID(id) 
                    && IsFormId(id);
        }
        
        private static bool IsID(string id)
        {
            Sitecore.Data.ID sitecoreID;
            return Sitecore.Data.ID.TryParse(id, out sitecoreID);
        }

        private static bool IsFormId(string id)
        {
            Item item = StaticSettings.ContextDatabase.GetItem(id);
            return item != null && item.TemplateID == IDs.FormTemplateID;
        }
    }
}

The FormRenderer above grabs the specified form’s ID via a query string parameter, ascertains whether it’s truly an ID, and determines whether it is an ID of a WFFM Form in Sitecore — these are done via the IsID and IsFormId methods.

If the supplied form ID is valid, we save it to the FormID property defined in the base FormerRender class. Otherwise, we flow through to the “out of the box” logic.

Now it’s time to register the above class in Sitecore.

I duplicated the “out of the box” Form Webcontrol under /sitecore/layout/Renderings/Modules/Web Forms for Marketers, renamed the item to something appropriate, and updated the code-defining fields to point to our new FormRender above:

Detect-ID-Form-FormRenderer

I decided to reuse an existing page item with a WFFM form — I didn’t want to step through ‘Insert Form’ wizard so that I could save time — and swapped out the “out of the box” Form Webcontrol with the new one we created above:

webcontrol-switch

I ensured we had a default form set just in case of query string manipulation, or in the event the form cannot be found by the given ID:

default-form-is-set

I published everything, and navigated to my form page:

no-form-specified

I then specified the empty guid:

invalid-form-specified

I manipulated the query string again, but this time passing a valid form ID:

valid-form-specified

I then changed the form ID again but with another valid form ID:

another-valid-form-specified

If you have any suggestions around making this better, or ideas for a different solution, please drop a comment.

Periodically Unlock Items of Idle Users in Sitecore

In my last post I showed a way to unlock locked items of a user when he/she logs out of Sitecore.

I wrote that article to help out the poster of this thread in one of the forums on SDN.

In response to my reply in that thread — I had linked to my previous post in that reply — John West, Chief Technology Officer of Sitecore, had asked whether we would also want to unlock items of users whose sessions had expired, and another SDN user had alluded to the fact that my solution would not unlock items for users who had closed their browser sessions instead of explicitly logging out of Sitecore.

Immediate after reading these responses, I began thinking about a supplemental solution to unlock items for “idle” users — users who have not triggered any sort of request in Sitecore after a certain amount of time.

I first began tinkering with the idea of using the last activity date/time of the logged in user — this is available as a DateTime in the user’s MembershipUser instance via the LastActivityDate property.

However — after reading this article — I learned this date and time does not mean what I thought it had meant, and decided to search for another way to ascertain whether a user is idle in Sitecore.

After some digging around, I discovered Sitecore.Web.Authentication.DomainAccessGuard.Sessions in Sitecore.Kernel.dll — this appears to be a collection of sessions in Sitecore — and immediately felt elated as if I had just won the lottery. I decided to put it to use in the following class (code in this class will be invoked via a scheduled task in Sitecore):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Web.Security;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Security.Accounts;
using Sitecore.Tasks;
using Sitecore.Web.Authentication;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Tasks
{
    public class UnlockItemsTask
    {
        private static readonly TimeSpan ElapsedTimeWhenIdle = GetElapsedTimeWhenIdle();

        public void UnlockIdleUserItems(Item[] items, CommandItem command, ScheduleItem schedule)
        {
            if (ElapsedTimeWhenIdle == TimeSpan.Zero)
            {
                return;
            }

            IEnumerable<Item> lockedItems = GetLockedItems(schedule.Database);
            foreach (Item lockedItem in lockedItems)
            {
                UnlockIfApplicable(lockedItem);
            }
        }
        
        private static IEnumerable<Item> GetLockedItems(Database database)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(database, "database");
            return database.SelectItems("fast://*[@__lock='%owner=%']");
        }

        private void UnlockIfApplicable(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if (!ShouldUnlockItem(item))
            {
                return;
            }
            
            Unlock(item);
        }

        private static bool ShouldUnlockItem(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if(!item.Locking.IsLocked())
            {
                return false;
            }

            string owner = item.Locking.GetOwner();
            return !IsUserAdmin(owner) && IsUserIdle(owner);
        }

        private static bool IsUserAdmin(string username)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(username, "username");
            User user = User.FromName(username, false);
            Assert.IsNotNull(user, "User must be null due to a wrinkle in the interwebs :-/");
            return user.IsAdministrator;
        }

        private static bool IsUserIdle(string username)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNullOrEmpty(username, "username");
            DomainAccessGuard.Session userSession = DomainAccessGuard.Sessions.Find(session => session.UserName == username);
            if(userSession == null)
            {
                return true;
            }

            return userSession.LastRequest.Add(ElapsedTimeWhenIdle) <= DateTime.Now;
        }

        private void Unlock(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            try
            {
                string owner = item.Locking.GetOwner();
                item.Editing.BeginEdit();
                item.Locking.Unlock();
                item.Editing.EndEdit();
                Log.Info(string.Format("Unlocked {0} - was locked by {1}", item.Paths.Path, owner), this);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(this.ToString(), ex, this);
            }
        }

        private static TimeSpan GetElapsedTimeWhenIdle()
        {
            TimeSpan elapsedTimeWhenIdle;
            if (TimeSpan.TryParse(Settings.GetSetting("UnlockItems.ElapsedTimeWhenIdle"), out elapsedTimeWhenIdle))
            {
                return elapsedTimeWhenIdle;
            }
            
            return TimeSpan.Zero;
        }
    }
}

Methods in the class above grab all locked items in Sitecore via a fast query, and unlock them if the users of each are not administrators, and are idle — I determine this from an idle threshold value that is stored in a custom setting (see the patch configuration file below) and the last time the user had made any sort of request in Sitecore via his/her DomainAccessGuard.Session instance from Sitecore.Web.Authentication.DomainAccessGuard.Sessions.

If a DomainAccessGuard.Session instance does not exist for the user — it’s null — this means the user’s session had expired, so we should also unlock the item.

I’ve also included code to log which items have been unlocked by the Unlock method — for auditing purposes — and of course log exceptions if any are encountered — we must do all we can to support our support teams by capturing information in log files :).

I then created a patch configuration file to store our idle threshold value — I’ve used one minute here for testing (I can’t sit around all day waiting for items to unlock ;)):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <settings>
      <setting name="UnlockItems.ElapsedTimeWhenIdle" value="00:00:01:00" />
    </settings>
  </sitecore>
</configuration> 

I then created a task command for the class above in Sitecore:

unlock-items-task-command

I then mapped the task command to a scheduled task (to learn about scheduled tasks, see John West’s blog post where he discusses them):

unlock-items-scheduled-task

Let’s light the fuse on this, and see what it does.

I logged into Sitecore using one of my test accounts, and locked some items:

locked-some-items

I then logged into Sitecore using a different account in a different browser session, and navigated to one of the locked items:

mike-locked-items

I then walked away, made a cup of coffee, returned, and saw this:

items-unlocked

I opened up my latest Sitecore log, and saw the following:

unlocked-log

I do want to caution you from running off with this code, and putting it into your Sitecore instance(s) — it is an all or nothing solution (it will unlock items for all non-adminstrators which might invoke some anger in users, and also defeat the purpose of locking items in the first place), so it’s quite important that a business decision is made before using this solution, or one that is similar in nature.

If you have any thoughts on this, please leave a comment.

Unlock Sitecore Users’ Items During Logout

The other day I saw a post in one of the SDN forums asking how one could go about building a solution to unlock items locked by a user when he/she logs out of Sitecore.

What immediately came to mind was building a new processor for the logout pipeline — this pipeline can be found at /configuration/sitecore/processors/logout in your Sitecore instance’s Web.config — but had to research how one would programmatically get all Sitecore items locked by the current user.

After a bit of fishing in Sitecore.Kernel.dll and Sitecore.Client.dll, I found a query in Sitecore.Client.dll that will give me all locked items for the current user:

fast-query-locked-items

Now all we need to do is add it into a custom logout pipeline processor:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using Sitecore.Data.Items;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;
using Sitecore.Pipelines.Logout;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.Logout
{
    public class UnlockMyItems
    {
        public void Process(LogoutArgs args)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(args, "args");
            UnlockMyItemsIfAny();
        }

        private void UnlockMyItemsIfAny()
        {
            IEnumerable<Item> lockedItems = GetMyLockedItems();
            if (!CanProcess(lockedItems))
            {
                return;
            }

            foreach (Item lockedItem in lockedItems)
            {
                Unlock(lockedItem);
            }
        }

        private static IEnumerable<Item> GetMyLockedItems()
        {
            return Context.ContentDatabase.SelectItems(GetMyLockedItemsQuery());
        }

        private static string GetMyLockedItemsQuery()
        {
            return string.Format("fast://*[@__lock='%\"{0}\"%']", Context.User.Name);
        }

        private static bool CanProcess(IEnumerable<Item> lockedItems)
        {
            return lockedItems != null
                    && lockedItems.Any()
                    && lockedItems.Select(item => item.Locking.HasLock()).Any();
        }

        private void Unlock(Item item)
        {
            Assert.ArgumentNotNull(item, "item");
            if (!item.Locking.HasLock())
            {
                return;
            }

            try
            {
                item.Editing.BeginEdit();
                item.Locking.Unlock();
                item.Editing.EndEdit();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(this.ToString(), ex, this);
            }
        }
    }
}

The class above grabs all items locked by the current user in the context content database. If none are found, we don’t move forward on processing.

When there are locked items for the current user, the code checks to see if each item is locked before unlocking, just in case some other account unlocks the item before we unlock it — I don’t know what would happen if we try to unlock an item that isn’t locked. If you know, please share in a comment.

I then injected the above pipeline processor into the logout pipeline using the following patch configuration file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <processors>
      <logout>
        <processor patch:after="*[@type='Sitecore.Pipelines.Logout.CheckModified, Sitecore.Kernel']" type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Pipelines.Logout.UnlockMyItems, Sitecore.Sandbox"/>
      </logout>
    </processors>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

Let’s test-drive this.

I first logged into Sitecore using my ‘mike’ account, and chose the Home item to lock:

lets-lock-home-item

It is now locked:

home-is-locked-1

In another session, I logged in using another account, and saw that ‘mike’ had locked the Home item:

home-is-locked-2

I switched back to the other session under the ‘mike’ user, and logged out:

IF

When I logged back in, I saw that the Home item was no longer locked:

item-now-unlocked

If you have any thoughts or suggestions on making this better, please share in a comment below.

Delete Associated Files on the Filesystem of Sitecore Items Deleted From the Recycle Bin

Last week a question was asked in one of the SDN forums on how one should go about deleting files on the filesystem that are associated with Items that are permanently deleted from the Recycle Bin — I wasn’t quite clear on what the original poster meant by files being linked to Items inside of Sitecore, but I assumed this relationship would be defined somewhere, or somehow.

After doing some research, I reckoned one could create a new command based on Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands.Archives.Delete in Sitecore.Kernel.dll to accomplish this:

Sitecore.Shell.Framework.Commands.Archives.Delete

However, I wasn’t completely satisfied with this approach, especially when it would require a substantial amount of copying and pasting of code — a practice that I vehemently abhor — and decided to seek out a different, if not better, way of doing this.

From my research, I discovered that one could just create his/her own Archive class — it would have to ultimately derive from Sitecore.Data.Archiving.Archive in Sitecore.Kernel — which would delete a file on the filesystem associated with a Sitecore Item:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;

using Sitecore.Configuration;
using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Archiving;
using Sitecore.Data.DataProviders.Sql;
using Sitecore.Diagnostics;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Data.Archiving
{
    public class FileSystemHookSqlArchive : SqlArchive
    {
        private static readonly string FolderPath = GetFolderPath();

        public FileSystemHookSqlArchive(string name, Database database)
            : base(name, database)
        {
        }

        public override void RemoveEntries(ArchiveQuery query)
        {
            DeleteFromFileSystem(query);
            base.RemoveEntries(query);
        }

        protected virtual void DeleteFromFileSystem(ArchiveQuery query)
        {
            if (query.ArchivalId == Guid.Empty)
            {
                return;
            }

            Guid itemId = GetItemId(query.ArchivalId);
            if (itemId == Guid.Empty)
            {
                return;
            }

            string filePath = GetFilePath(itemId.ToString());
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(filePath))
            {
                return;
            }

            TryDeleteFile(filePath);
        }

        private void TryDeleteFile(string filePath)
        {
            try
            {
                if (File.Exists(filePath))
                {
                    File.Delete(filePath);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Error(this.ToString(), ex, this);
            }
        }

        public virtual Guid GetItemId(Guid archivalId)
        {
            if (archivalId == Guid.Empty)
            {
                return Guid.Empty;
            }
            
            ArchiveQuery query = new ArchiveQuery
            {
                ArchivalId = archivalId
            };

            SqlStatement selectStatement = GetSelectStatement(query, "{0}ItemId{1}");
            if (selectStatement == null)
            {
                return Guid.Empty;
            }
            return GetGuid(selectStatement.Sql, selectStatement.GetParameters(), Guid.Empty);
        }

        private Guid GetGuid(string sql, object[] parameters, Guid defaultValue)
        {
            using (DataProviderReader reader = Api.CreateReader(sql, parameters))
            {
                if (!reader.Read())
                {
                    return defaultValue;
                }
                return Api.GetGuid(0, reader);
            }
        }

        private static string GetFilePath(string fileName)
        {
            string filePath = Directory.GetFiles(FolderPath, string.Concat(fileName, "*.*")).FirstOrDefault();
            if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(filePath))
            {
                return filePath;    
            }

            return string.Empty;
        }

        private static string GetFolderPath()
        {
            return HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(Settings.GetSetting("FileSystemHookSqlArchive.Folder"));
        }
    }
}

In the subclass of Sitecore.Data.Archiving.SqlArchive above — I’m using Sitecore.Data.Archiving.SqlArchive since I’m using SqlServer for my Sitecore instance — I try to find a file that is named after its associated Item’s ID — minus the curly braces — in a folder that I’ve mapped in a configuration include file (see below).

I first have to get the Item’s ID from the database using the supplied ArchivalId — this is all the calling code gives us, so we have to make do with what we have.

If the file exists, we try to delete it — we do this before letting the base class delete the Item from Recycle Bin so that we can retrieve the Item’s ID from the database before it’s removed from the Archive database table — and log any errors we encounter upon exception.

I then hooked in an instance of the above Archive class in a custom Sitecore.Data.Archiving.ArchiveProvider class:

using System.Xml;

using Sitecore.Data;
using Sitecore.Data.Archiving;
using Sitecore.Xml;

namespace Sitecore.Sandbox.Data.Archiving
{
    public class FileSystemHookSqlArchiveProvider : SqlArchiveProvider
    {
        protected override Archive GetArchive(XmlNode configNode, Database database)
        {
            string attribute = XmlUtil.GetAttribute("name", configNode);
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(attribute))
            {
                return null;
            }

            return new FileSystemHookSqlArchive(attribute, database);
        }
    }
}

The above class — which derives from Sitecore.Data.Archiving.SqlArchiveProvider since I’m using SqlServer — only overrides its base class’s GetArchive factory method. We instantiate an instance of our Archive class instead of the “out of the box” Sitecore.Data.Archiving.SqlArchive class within it.

I then had to replace the “out of the box” Sitecore.Data.Archiving.ArchiveProvider reference, and define the location of our files in the following configuration file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns:patch="http://www.sitecore.net/xmlconfig/">
  <sitecore>
    <archives defaultProvider="sql" enabled="true">
      <providers>
        <add name="sql" patch:instead="add[@type='Sitecore.Data.Archiving.SqlArchiveProvider, Sitecore.Kernel']" type="Sitecore.Sandbox.Data.Archiving.FileSystemHookSqlArchiveProvider, Sitecore.Sandbox" database="*"/>
      </providers>
    </archives>
    <settings>
      <setting name="FileSystemHookSqlArchive.Folder" value="/test/" />
    </settings>
  </sitecore>
</configuration>

Let’s test this out.

I first created a test Item to delete:

test-item-to-delete

I then had to create a test file on the filesystem in my test folder — the test folder lives in my Sitecore instance’s website root:

test-folder-with-test-file

I deleted the test Item from the content tree, opened up the Recycle Bin, selected the test Item, and got an itchy trigger finger — I want to delete the Item forever 🙂 :

delete-file-forever

After clicking the Delete button, I saw that the file on the filesystem was deleted as well:

file-was-deleted

If you have any thoughts on this, or recommendations around making it better, please leave a comment.